Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Tell Twitter to Go Green With a #NatureSelfie

Business
Tell Twitter to Go Green With a #NatureSelfie

To celebrate the summer season, Greenpeace wants to see how you enjoy the outdoors and help convince Twitter to go green with their #NatureSelfie contest.

All you have to do it snap a photo of you getting outside and doing something. Maybe you’re grilling out in the backyard, splashing around in your nearest swimmin’ hole or lacing up your hiking boots. Anything that gets you outdoors and reconnecting with the world around you. Post your photo to Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Google+ and tag it with #NatureSelfie.

Greenpeace will collect all the photos and feature their favorites on The Environmentalist.

Your #NatureSelfie can also help convince Twitter to follow the likes of Facebook and Google by powering their platform with 100 percent renewable energy.

When posting your photo to Twitter, mention @Twitter and ask them to make your #NatureSelfie green.

A green selfie is one posted on a platform that uses renewable energy for their data centers. Facebook, Google and Instagram recently committed to green energy by harnessing renewables like wind and solar to power their data centers. Twitter and Pinterest have yet to make such a commitment.

Greenpeace hatches a green Twitter bird outside of the company’s headquarters. Photo credit: Greenpeace USA

Currently, Twitter along with Pinterest, Amazon, Netflix and more power their sites with dirty energy like coal and gas. We know with enough pressure from their users, those companies will follow Apple, Google and Facebook and commit to 100 percent clean energy for their data centers so we can all #ClickClean.

Post and tag your #NatureSelfie on your favorite social media platform and urge Twitter to switch to clean, renewable energy and contribute to a greener internet for us all.

 

Radiation-contaminated water tanks and damaged reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on Feb. 25, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Christopher Furlong / Getty Images

Japan will release radioactive wastewater from the failed Fukushima nuclear plant into the Pacific Ocean, the government announced on Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier, aka the doomsday glacier, is seen here in 2014. NASA / Wikimedia Commons / CC0

Scientists have maneuvered an underwater robot beneath Antarctica's "doomsday glacier" for the first time, and the resulting data is not reassuring.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Journalists film a protest by the environmental organization BUND at the Datteln coal-fired power plant in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany on April 23, 2020. Bernd Thissen / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

Lead partners of a global consortium of news outlets that aims to improve reporting on the climate emergency released a statement on Monday urging journalists everywhere to treat their coverage of the rapidly heating planet with the same same level of urgency and intensity as they have the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read More Show Less
Airborne microplastics are turning up in remote regions of the world, including the remote Altai mountains in Siberia. Kirill Kukhmar / TASS / Getty Images

Scientists consider plastic pollution one of the "most pressing environmental and social issues of the 21st century," but so far, microplastic research has mostly focused on the impact on rivers and oceans.

Read More Show Less
A laborer works at the site of a rare earth metals mine at Nancheng county, Jiangxi province, China on Oct. 7, 2010. Jie Zhao / Corbis via Getty Images

By Michel Penke

More than every second person in the world now has a cellphone, and manufacturers are rolling out bigger, better, slicker models all the time. Many, however, have a bloody history.

Read More Show Less