Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Tell Congress to Keep Anti-Wildlife Attacks off Funding Bills

Endangered Species Coalition

Congressional Republicans have attached a dizzying myriad of anti-environment and anti-wildlife provisions to year-end spending legislation. These last minute additions do not affect overall spending or taxes, but are giveaways to big money industry lobbyists. Provisions include:

  • Putting endangered and threatened bird, fish and amphibian species at risk by stopping the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from upholding its Clean Water Act responsibilities that protect wetlands and streams from toxic pollutants.
  • Allowing power plants and oil and gas refineries to dump unlimited amounts of pollution into the air by prohibiting the EPA from limiting carbon dioxide discharges—hastening climate change and putting already imperiled species at unjustifiable risk.
  • Forcing the approval of more risky, offshore drilling by requiring the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement to issue quarterly reports to Congress explaining its reasons for not approving each oil and gas permit it receives.
  • Putting wildlife and an iconic landmark in peril by opening the public lands adjacent to the Grand Canyon to dirty uranium mining.
  • Exposing wildlife to poisonous pesticides by blocking the EPA from taking any measures recommended by federal wildlife experts to protect endangered species from pesticide application.
  • Obstructing judicial review of gray wolf Endangered Species Act delistings in Wyoming and the nine states within the Western Great Lakes Distinct Population Segment. This end-run around the democratic process deprives the public of its right to petition for judicial review of bad policy and undermines the system of checks and balances vital to sound government.
  • Attacking protections for endangered and threatened wild bighorn sheep. Endangered Species Act protections for bighorns in the West would be virtually eliminated to benefit a handful of sheep ranchers.

Take action—Call your member of Congress and senators and urge them to pass a clean omnibus spending bill.

For more information, click here.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The CDC has emphasized that washing hands with soap and water is one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Guido Mieth / Moment / Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control has emphasized that washing hands with soap and water is one of the most effective measures we can take in preventing the spread of COVID-19. However, millions of Americans in some of the most vulnerable communities face the prospect of having their water shut off during the lockdowns, according to The Guardian.

Read More Show Less
A California newt (Taricha torosa) from Napa County, California, USA. Connor Long / CC BY-SA 3.0

Aerial photos of the Sierra Nevada — the long mountain range stretching down the spine of California — showed rust-colored swathes following the state's record-breaking five-year drought that ended in 2016. The 100 million dead trees were one of the most visible examples of the ecological toll the drought had wrought.

Now, a few years later, we're starting to learn about how smaller, less noticeable species were affected.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Disinfectants and cleaners claiming to sanitize against the novel coronavirus have started to flood the market.
Natthawat / Moment / Getty Images

Disinfectants and cleaners claiming to sanitize against the novel coronavirus have started to flood the market, raising concerns for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which threatened legal recourse against retailers selling unregistered products, according to The New York Times.

Read More Show Less
A customer packs groceries in reusable bags at a NYC supermarket on March 1, 2020. Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images

The global coronavirus pandemic has thrown our daily routine into disarray. Billions are housebound, social contact is off-limits and an invisible virus makes up look at the outside world with suspicion. No surprise, then, that sustainability and the climate movement aren't exactly a priority for many these days.

Read More Show Less
Ingredients are displayed for the Old School Pinto Beans from the Decolonize Your Diet cookbook by Luz Calvo and Catriona Rueda Esquibel. Melissa Renwick / Toronto Star via Getty Images

By Molly Matthews Multedo

Livestock farming contributes to global warming, so eating less meat can be better for the climate.

Read More Show Less