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Tell Congress to Keep Anti-Wildlife Attacks off Funding Bills

Tell Congress to Keep Anti-Wildlife Attacks off Funding Bills

Endangered Species Coalition

Congressional Republicans have attached a dizzying myriad of anti-environment and anti-wildlife provisions to year-end spending legislation. These last minute additions do not affect overall spending or taxes, but are giveaways to big money industry lobbyists. Provisions include:

  • Putting endangered and threatened bird, fish and amphibian species at risk by stopping the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from upholding its Clean Water Act responsibilities that protect wetlands and streams from toxic pollutants.
  • Allowing power plants and oil and gas refineries to dump unlimited amounts of pollution into the air by prohibiting the EPA from limiting carbon dioxide discharges—hastening climate change and putting already imperiled species at unjustifiable risk.
  • Forcing the approval of more risky, offshore drilling by requiring the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement to issue quarterly reports to Congress explaining its reasons for not approving each oil and gas permit it receives.
  • Putting wildlife and an iconic landmark in peril by opening the public lands adjacent to the Grand Canyon to dirty uranium mining.
  • Exposing wildlife to poisonous pesticides by blocking the EPA from taking any measures recommended by federal wildlife experts to protect endangered species from pesticide application.
  • Obstructing judicial review of gray wolf Endangered Species Act delistings in Wyoming and the nine states within the Western Great Lakes Distinct Population Segment. This end-run around the democratic process deprives the public of its right to petition for judicial review of bad policy and undermines the system of checks and balances vital to sound government.
  • Attacking protections for endangered and threatened wild bighorn sheep. Endangered Species Act protections for bighorns in the West would be virtually eliminated to benefit a handful of sheep ranchers.

Take action—Call your member of Congress and senators and urge them to pass a clean omnibus spending bill.

For more information, click here.

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