Quantcast

Target, Giant Eagle, Meijer Join Major Retailers Saying No to GE Salmon

GMO

Friends of the Earth

Today, the Campaign for GE-Free Seafood—a coalition of more than 30 consumer, health, food safety and fishing groups led by Friends of the Earth—announced that Target and other large mainstream grocery retailers across the U.S. have committed to not sell genetically engineered (GE) salmon if it is approved.   

These new store policies were released today by Greenpeace in its Carting Away the Oceans report, which assesses the sustainable seafood policies of U.S. retailers. 

Stores that will not sell GE salmon include Target, a national retailer that sells seafood in 1,394 stores; the H-E-B chain with 315 stores in Texas; Giant Eagle with 387 stores in Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and Maryland; and Meijer, with 200 stores in Michigan, Indiana and other states in the Rust Belt. These stores join 55 other food retailers that made similar commitments earlier this year, including Trader Joe’s, Aldi, Whole Foods, Marsh and Hy-Vee.

The total number of companies committed to not sell GE seafood now stands at 59 retailers representing 4,662 grocery stores across the country.

“There’s no room on our plates for genetically engineered seafood. Consumers don’t want it and price-competitive stores across middle America are refusing to sell it,” said Eric Hoffman, food and technology policy campaigner with Friends of the Earth. “We applaud Target and all these retailers for listening to the vast majority of their customers who want sustainable seafood for their families,” Hoffman said. "We need to see more big retailers take this kind of initiative. We're hoping that Safeway, which has become a real leader in seafood sustainability in other ways, and other major grocery stores turn the corner here and pledge to stay away from genetically engineered salmon."

The market rejection of genetically engineered fish comes as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) conducts its final review of GE salmon. More than 1.8 million people submitted comments to the FDA opposing what would be the first-ever GE animal approved by regulators for the human food supply. 

In related news, a new peer-reviewed study published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society, provides evidence that GE salmon can breed with wild trout and create offspring that grow even faster and can outcompete wild fish—increasing concerns about environmental damage. 

The majority of Americans say they won’t eat genetically engineered seafood and 91 percent of Americans say the FDA should not allow it into the market. Eighty percent of Americans who regularly eat fish say that sustainable practices are "important" or "very important" to them.

“Simply put, this genetically engineered fish is a problem masquerading as a solution,” said Heather Whitehead, online campaigns director at Center for Food Safety. “It’s bad for the consumer, bad for the environment and bad for our native salmon. Since these fish will likely not be labeled, consumers have to rely on retailers like these to reject unwanted and unnecessary GE fish. We will continue to pressure other retailers to side with consumers.”

The FDA said it will likely not label GE salmon, providing consumers no way of knowing if the fish they are feeding their families is genetically engineered. At least 35 other species of GE fish are currently under development, and the FDA’s decision on this GE salmon application will set a precedent for other GE fish and animals (including cows, chickens and pigs) to enter the global food market.

To avoid confusion in the marketplace and ensure sustainable seafood, a coalition of more than 30 groups led by Friends of the Earth are asking grocery stores, seafood restaurants, chefs and seafood companies to join the Pledge for GE-Free Seafood and publicly commit to not knowingly purchase or sell GE salmon or other GE seafood. 

Visit EcoWatch’s GENETICALLY ENGINEERED FOOD page for more related news on this topic.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Brianna Elliott, RD

Vitamin C is a very important nutrient that's abundant in many fruits and vegetables.

Read More Show Less
BLM drill seeders work to restore native grasses after wildfire on the Bowden Hills Wilderness Study Area in southeast Oregon, Dec. 14, 2018. Marcus Johnson / BLM / CC BY 2.0

By Tara Lohan

In 2017 the Thomas fire raged through 281,893 acres in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties, California, leaving in its wake a blackened expanse of land, burned vegetation, and more than 1,000 destroyed buildings.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Brogues Cozens-Mcneelance / EyeEm / Getty Images

By Alina Petre, MS, RD

Fruit juice is generally perceived as healthy and far superior to sugary soda.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Danielle Nierenberg and Katherine Walla

As the holiday season ramps up for many across the world, Food Tank is highlighting 15 children's books that will introduce young eaters, growers and innovators to the world of food and agriculture. Authors and organizations are working to show children the importance — and fun — of eating healthy, nutritious and delicious food, growing their own produce, and giving food to others in need.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Alina Petre, MS, RD (CA)

Purple cabbage, also referred to as red cabbage, belongs to the Brassica genus of plants. This group includes nutrient-dense vegetables, such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and kale.

Read More Show Less