Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Taking a Stand for Clean Water and Healthy Ecosystems

Orange County Coastkeeper

By Steve Bone

The California experience that brings in millions of dollars in tourism revenue rests on the promise of clean, safe water. Dirty water and closed beaches due to bacteria and contamination will smear beach cities’ reputations and severely damage the tourism industry. It is time for Californians to take a stand and make their demands for clean water.

The famous Huntington Beach Pier at sunset.

Too often the benefits of a protected environment are overshadowed by the costs of conservation. Valuing ecosystem services is often difficult, but when weighing the benefits of a flourishing ecosystem we can see major economic benefits. Clean water, long undervalued, contributes heavily to major sectors of the economy in Orange County and benefits local businesses, industries and residents.

In Huntington Beach alone, ten miles of uninterrupted beachfront draw an annual visitor population of more than 16 million people. Tourists flock to these beaches from around the world expecting our beautiful sand and surf. The city’s annual U.S. Open of Surfing alone wrangled in $21.5 million in spending throughout Orange County, with $16.5 million in Huntington Beach.

The state Legislature’s passage of Senate Concurrent Resolution 48 urges Californians to reclaim and celebrate their right to clean and safe water. The resolution, which declared July 25 as "Swimmable California Day", sheds light on the need for future political actions that safeguard our clean water. Clean water goes beyond political and geographical boundaries and impacts us all. The public must come together in the fight for clean water to show that an issue as critical as clean water cannot be divided by political agendas.

Swimmable California Day was a celebration and reminder of the tremendous effort it takes to protect clean water for our economy and coastal livelihoods. Swimmable California Day set the foundation for starting a conversation about water and our relationship to it. By beginning the conversation about clean water and generating an informed population of concerned individuals, organizations like Orange County Coastkeeper can help bolster community support for comprehensive action to protect the health and safety of our water.

As the President of the Huntington Beach Marketing and Visitors Bureau, I understand the aesthetic, recreational, economic and cultural value of clean water. By spending the time and effort now to protect our water, we effectively safeguard the vital economic interests of our community.

Visit EcoWatch’s WATER page for more related news on this topic.

——–

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Food Tank

By Danielle Nierenberg and Alonso Diaz

With record high unemployment, a reeling global economy, and concerns of food shortages, the world as we know it is changing. But even as these shifts expose inequities in the health and food systems, many experts hope that the current moment offers an opportunity to build a new and more sustainable food system.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Brian J. Love and Julie Rieland

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the U.S. recycling industry. Waste sources, quantities and destinations are all in flux, and shutdowns have devastated an industry that was already struggling.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Kris Gunnars, BSc

Unhealthy foods play a primary role in many people gaining weight and developing chronic health conditions, more now than ever before.

Read More Show Less
A man pushes his mother in a wheelchair down Ocean Drive in South Beach, Miami on May 19, 2020, amid the novel coronavirus pandemic. CHANDAN KHANNA / AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. reported more than 55,000 new coronavirus cases on Thursday, in a sign that the outbreak is not letting up as the Fourth of July weekend kicks off.

Read More Show Less
To better understand how people influence the overall health of dolphins, Oklahoma State University's Unmanned Systems Research Institute is developing a drone to collect samples from the spray that comes from their blowholes. Ken Y. / CC by 2.0

By Jason Bruck

Human actions have taken a steep toll on whales and dolphins. Some studies estimate that small whale abundance, which includes dolphins, has fallen 87% since 1980 and thousands of whales die from rope entanglement annually. But humans also cause less obvious harm. Researchers have found changes in the stress levels, reproductive health and respiratory health of these animals, but this valuable data is extremely hard to collect.

Read More Show Less

Sunscreen pollution is accelerating the demise of coral reefs globally by causing permanent DNA damage to coral. gonzalo martinez / iStock / Getty Images Plus

On July 29, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis signed into law a controversial bill prohibiting local governments from banning certain types of sunscreens.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Oat milk is popping up at coffee shops and grocery stores alike, quickly becoming one of the trendiest plant-based milks. jacqueline / CC by 2.0

By Kelli McGrane

Oat milk is popping up at coffee shops and grocery stores alike, quickly becoming one of the trendiest plant-based milks.

Read More Show Less