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TAKE ACTION: Prevent the BP Oil Disaster from Happening Again

Save Our Gulf

Sign this petition today and ask the directors of the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement and Bureau of Ocean Energy Management to enforce strict regulations that make off-shore drilling safe.

 

CLICK HERE TO SIGN THE CHANGE.ORG PETITION

 

When the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded on April 20, 2010, killing 11 workers and spewing millions of barrels of oil, it left the Gulf and surrounding communities gasping for life support. Gulf Coast families continue to face health and financial crises, and an ecological disaster with an unsympathetic ear from BP's corporate heads.

The incompetent actions of BP purely to maximize their profits have unbelievably and inexcusably cost lives and damaged a family treasure for many.

BP should be held accountable for their actions and the industry as a whole must, at the very least, prove it is capable of protecting human and environmental health before being granted a permit to drill.

We are not better prepared for a disaster now than we were in 2010. "Regulation" has become a dirty word courtesy of oil lobbyists in Washington, D.C. We already know what happens when nobody is watching Big Oil—cutting corners at our expense. It is time we answer back.

Until we can assure the safety of these drilling projects, there should be no more permits granted to BP or any other company. BP's actions cannot be overlooked or written off. Unless permits are enforceable, making rigs safe, reliable and readily monitored, they MUST NOT be granted.

Help us keep our nation's waters safe from irresponsible polluters. This goes beyond the Gulf, what we have seen here could happen in your backyard.

Send a message to Washington asking for strict, enforceable regulations that make off-shore drilling safe for the environment and its people.

Deepwater drilling permits should NOT be issued until the Oil Spill Commission's recommendations are implemented.

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Save Our Gulf is an initiative of Waterkeeper Alliance to support the Gulf Waterkeepers directly impacted by the BP oil disaster, including Mobile Baykeeper, Lower Mississippi Riverkeeper, Louisiana Bayoukeeper, Galveston Baykeeper, Apalachicola Riverkeeper, and Emerald Coastkeeper.

 

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