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Want to Help Endangered Species? Here’s How to Take Action Locally

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Want to Help Endangered Species? Here’s How to Take Action Locally
A river cleanup in Union County, New Jersey. Paige Bollman / CC BY 2.0

One of the questions people ask me most often is what they can do locally to help endangered species. Well, I recently appeared on the Green Divas podcast to talk about that very subject. We discussed the horror of lawns, the danger of cars, great ways to volunteer, and other efforts you can take to make your neck of the woods a little bit safer for rare plants and wildlife.


You can listen to the episode below:

Reposted with permission from our media associate The Revelator.

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