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By Bruno Vander Velde

Our diets are—to put it bluntly—a problem for the planet.

About a quarter of global greenhouse gas emissions can be traced to food in some way. So what you put on your plate actually matters a lot more than you think.

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Car collisions with deer, elk and moose happen about a million times a year, but what if animals had their own crossings to move around safely?

In Banff National Park, the strategic placement of wildlife overpasses and underpasses has proven to be immensely successful. If implemented widely, such a system could reduce the extreme costs in animal lives and billions of dollars to humans.

And as climate change forces animals to migrate, their need to cross roads will only increase.

Watch this video from Vox to see how this problem—and the cost of addressing it—can be solved today.

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Marine life rely on sound to navigate, socialize, and find food and mates, but it's becoming increasingly difficult for them to hear each other. Noise caused by human activity is now an inescapable threat to their lives.

In the video above from Vox, we hear some of the amazing sounds that underwater creatures make, and learn how they're impacted by noise pollution.

From leisure boats to industrial seismic blasting, humans have created an extreme situation. It's hard not to compare it to sound torture, now banned for being cruel and unusual punishment!

If we wouldn't inflict such pain on our worst enemies, then why are we so ruthless to our neighbors in the sea?

Be sure to watch the video to the end to get to the good news!

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The solar energy revolution just keeps getting stronger. Last year, 130,000 people worked as solar installers, while only 51,000 people worked in coal mining. What caused such a drastic shift, and what does it mean for the future?

Check out this enlightening video from Vox to see the most important factors—the ones politicians don't talk about when they talk about bringing back coal jobs.

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With no shortage of evidence that climate change is real, how can there be any debate?

This video from Vox explores the hazy relationship between scientists and public opinion. For all their knowledge, scientists often struggle to communicate clearly.

Watch the video above, and see why the message of climate change needs many voices, and why yours could be the most persuasive!

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