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A new survey from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine found that nearly 40 percent of people are sleep-deprived the Monday after the Super Bowl. Anna Bizon / Getty Images
  • Last year, an estimated 14 million people were planning to take off work the day after the Super Bowl on what's become the most famous sick day of the year: #SuperSickMonday.
  • A new survey finds that 40 percent of people say they're sleep-deprived the day after the Super Bowl.
  • Even just one night of sleep deprivation can take a toll on your physical and mental health.

A new survey from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) found nearly 40 percent of people are sleep-deprived the Monday after the Super Bowl.

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Ambassadors with the #SuperCoralPlay campaign. Nicolette Amico / Newlink

Only the Kansas City Chiefs and the San Francisco 49ers will get to play in Super Bowl 54 in Miami Sunday. But anyone can make a #SuperCoralPlay.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A screenshot from the Budweiser "Wind Never Felt Better" 2019 Super Bowl commercial. YouTube

Budweiser's parent company is continuing to associate with groups with anti-climate agendas and ties to dark money, despite several ads aired during Sunday night's Super Bowl that portray the beverage giant as environmentally friendly, The New Republic reports.

Three of eight commercials aired by Anheuser-Busch on Sunday had themes around renewable energy, water conservation and organic farming, including one spot that brags that Budweiser is "brewed with wind power for a better tomorrow."

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Cision PR Newswire

When we think of Budweiser's Super Bowl commercials, images of croaking frogs or horses playing football usually come to mind. But for this year's big game in Atlanta, the beer giant is going green.

Budweiser, which switched all its U.S. beer brewing to renewable energy last year, debuted a dreamy spot called, "Wind Never Felt Better," featuring its iconic Clydesdales, a Dalmatian and wind turbines.

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U.S. Bank Stadium

By Marlene Cimons

Early one December morning in 2010, the inflatable roof on the Minnesota Vikings' old stadium in Minneapolis ruptured and collapsed under the weight of 17 inches of wet snow. No one was hurt, but the incident was a wake-up call for the Vikings' front office. The team needed a new facility that could withstand the rigors of a Minnesota winter.

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