Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Did you know that at least one-third of adults in the U.S. report insufficient sleep or a sleep disorder? If a lack of quality shut-eye sounds familiar, it may be time to try one of the best melatonin supplements on the market.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Avocado

Increased consumer interest in sustainability has largely driven the expansion of new organic product lines. It's this combination of consumer consciousness and evolved eco-friendly products that has people searching for the best organic mattress.

But there are many brands in this space. We wanted to take a closer look at the Avocado mattress and explore what makes it such a popular pick in the eco-market.

Read More Show Less

Like many other plant-based foods and products, CBD oil is one dietary supplement where "organic" labels are very important to consumers. However, there are little to no regulations within the hemp industry when it comes to deeming a product as organic, which makes it increasingly difficult for shoppers to find the best CBD oil products available on the market.

Read More Show Less
Catherine Delahaye / The Image Bank / Getty Images Plus

If you're feeling that mid-afternoon sluggishness, it may help to give into temptation and doze off for a little while. Just don't do it too often.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A considerable portion of the population sleeps past sunrise. aphrodite74 / E+ / Getty Images

By Steve Calandrillo

In my research on daylight saving time, I have found that Americans don't like it when Congress messes with their clocks.

In an effort to avoid the biannual clock switch in spring and fall, some well-intended critics of DST have made the mistake of suggesting that the abolition of DST – and a return to permanent standard time – would benefit society. In other words, the U.S. would never "spring forward" or "fall back."

Read More Show Less
Salting streets in Milwaukee. Michael Pereckas / CC BY-SA

By Jennifer Marie Hurley

Every winter, local governments across the U.S. apply millions of tons of road salt to keep streets navigable during snow and ice storms. Runoff from melting snow carries road salt into streams and lakes, and causes many bodies of water to have extraordinarily high salinity.

At Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, my colleague Rick Relyea and his lab are working to quantify how increases in salinity affect ecosystems. Not surprisingly, they have found that high salinity has negative impacts on many species. They have also discovered that some species have the ability to cope with these increases in salinity.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Trending