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By Jacob Carter

On Wednesday, the Department of the Interior (DOI) announced that it will be rescinding secretarial order 3369, which sidelined scientific research and its use in the agency's decisions. Put in place by the previous administration, the secretarial order restricted decisionmakers at the DOI from using scientific studies that did not make all data publicly available.

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The DOI effectively suspended the issuance of public lands drilling permits just hours after President Biden's inauguration. Pgiam / Getty Images

The Interior Department is revoking about 70 oil and gas drilling permits issued, invalidly, during the first days of the Biden administration, Bloomberg reports.

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Xsandra / Getty Images

Looking for ways to cut down on single-use plastic while grocery shopping? You may already have eco-friendly shopping bags, but bringing your own reusable produce bags is another easy swap.

According to the UN Environment Program, up to 5 trillion single-use plastic bags are used globally each year, and because of the material they're made from, most municipal recycling centers don't accept them (more on this below).

The most sustainable option is to skip the bag altogether. You can also make your own reusable produce bags out of old T-shirts. But if you'd rather purchase them new, here are our recommendations for the best reusable produce bags on the market today.

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U.S. President Joe Biden speaks about climate change issues in the State Dining Room of the White House on January 27, 2021 in Washington, DC. Anna Moneymaker-Pool / Getty Images

President Joe Biden signed a sweeping executive order Wednesday to address the climate crisis.

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President Joe Biden signs executive orders in the State Dining Room at the White House on Jan. 22, 2021 in Washington, DC. Jabin Botsford / The Washington Post via Getty Images

By Andrew Rosenberg

The first 24 hours of the administration of President Joe Biden were filled not only with ceremony, but also with real action. Executive orders and other directives were quickly signed. More actions have followed. All consequential. Many provide a basis for not just undoing actions of the previous administration, but also making real advances in public policy to protect public health, safety, and the environment.

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Doug Emhoff, U.S. Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, Jill Biden and President-elect Joe Biden wave as they arrive on the East Front of the U.S. Capitol for the inauguration on Jan. 20, 2021 in Washington, DC. Joe Raedle / Getty Images

By John R. Platt

The period of the 45th presidency will go down as dark days for the United States — not just for the violent insurgency and impeachment that capped off Donald Trump's four years in office, but for every regressive action that came before.

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The administration went after the Endangered Species Act by finalizing a rule that narrows the definition of habitat to only areas that currently support a species. Chase Dekker Wild-Life Images / Getty Images

By Tara Lohan

This holiday season just about everything was different. Vacations were postponed. Parties and family get-togethers were canceled or moved online as folks hunkered down at the request of public-health officials. But one thing continued as usual: President Trump's attacks on the environment.

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Darrell House, an Indigenous man and Marine Corps veteran, was tasered by a National Park Service ranger on Dec. 27, 2020 in New Mexico's Petroglyph National Monument after he walked off a trail and failed to cooperate with the ranger's requests. Darrell House / Instagram

By Brett Wilkins

Indigenous and wilderness conservation groups were among those on Wednesday responding with outrage to video of a National Park Service ranger tasering an unarmed Indigenous man after he walked off a trail in Petroglyph National Monument in New Mexico on Sunday and then refused to comply with the ranger's orders.

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A February game of hockey at Dufferin Grove Park Ice Rink in Toronto, Ontario drew attention to global warming as children splashed across the wet ice and puddles. Peter Power / Toronto Star via Getty Images


People who love winter sports like skiing and snowboarding know there's something special about being out in the cold.

"We find things in deep winter or at high altitude elevations that we don't find anywhere else, that speak very directly to our connection to nature and to the human soul, really," says Mario Molina, executive director of the nonprofit Protect Our Winters.

He says people who enjoy winter sports want to preserve this experience for future generations.

"They want to pass those sports on to their kids and their grandkids," Molina says.

But global warming is causing warmer winters and more precipitation to fall as rain instead of snow. That puts winter sports at risk.

So the Protect Our Winters campaign mobilizes outdoor enthusiasts to take action.

"We turn passionate outdoor enthusiasts into effective climate advocates," Molina says.

For example, one campaign encourages athletes to speak out against fossil fuel extraction on public lands. Another asks winter sports lovers to contact their elected officials in support of clean energy.

So Protect Our Winters encourages everyone from casual skiers to big-mountain snowboarders to get involved, join together, and demand climate action.

Reporting credit: Stephanie Manuzak / ChavoBart Digital Media.

Reposted with permission from Yale Climate Connections.

A humpback whale in Tongass National Forest, Alaska. Danita Delimont / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

A coalition of Indigenous groups, businesses, and conservation organizations on Wednesday sued the Trump administration over its "arbitrary and reckless" removal of roadless protections for the nearly 17 million-acre Tongass National Forest in Alaska, warning that the rollback could devastate local communities, wildlife, and the climate.

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Shasta dam and lake near Redding, California. Kelly M. Grow / California Department of Water Resources

By Tara Lohan

In the aftermath of the Nov. 3 election, President Donald Trump has tried every trick in the book to avoid facing the reality of his loss. A barrage of lawsuits accompanied by disinformation campaigns has attempted to cast doubt on the legitimacy of the election.

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Protestors walk past an image of a Native American woman during a march to "Count Every Vote, Protect Every Person" after the U.S. presidential Election in Seattle, Washington on November 4. Jason Redmond / AFP / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

A leading environmental advocacy group marked Native American Heritage Month on Wednesday by urging President-elect Joe Biden, Vice President-elect Kamala Kamala Harris, and the entire incoming administration "to honor Indigenous sovereignty and immediately halt the Keystone XL, Dakota Access, and Line 3 pipelines."

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Sunrise in Redwood National Park in California. HadelProductions / E+ / Getty Images

A new study from scientists at the University of Geneva concludes different features are necessary for forests to better capture carbon — an important process continually studied due to climate change — including location, size and climate.

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