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Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

mountain plants

On the summit of Piz Linard in the Swiss Alps, where botanists recently identified 16 plant species. In 1835 only one was found. Hansueli Rhyner, SLF, Switzerland

By Tim Radford

Mountain plants are on the rise. The number of species on the highest European mountains has multiplied fivefold.

Data gathered over 145 years from 302 peaks shows that the count of wild plants that have colonized the highest zones has increased five times faster than during a comparable decade 50 years ago.

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waterlust.com / @tulasendlesssummer_sierra .

Each product featured here has been independently selected by the writer. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

The bright patterns and recognizable designs of Waterlust's activewear aren't just for show. In fact, they're meant to promote the conversation around sustainability and give back to the ocean science and conservation community.

Each design is paired with a research lab, nonprofit, or education organization that has high intellectual merit and the potential to move the needle in its respective field. For each product sold, Waterlust donates 10% of profits to these conservation partners.

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