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Pipeline Fighters from Nebraska and across the region marched through the streets of Lincoln, Nebraska Aug. 6. Bold Nebraska

Native Tribes Continue Fight Against Pipelines

The Standing Rock Sioux and Cheyenne River Sioux tribes asked a federal judge Tuesday to shut down the Dakota Access pipeline.

While the tribes insist that a June order instructing the Army Corps of Engineers to complete a more thorough analysis of the pipeline means that pipeline operations should be shut down in the meantime, the tribes also "reluctantly" proposed improvements, including creating a spill response plan, should the court decide to keep the pipeline running.

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Dave Bates / Twitter

150+ Tribes Opposing Keystone XL Promise to Stop It in Its Tracks

The Intertribal Coalition of Nebraska and the Ponca Nation of Oklahoma met Tuesday in Lincoln, Nebraska to take a stand against the construction of TransCanada's Keystone XL pipeline by signing the Treaty Alliance Against Tar Sands Expansion.

After the signing Tuesday, more than 150 Tribes in the U.S. and Canada, including the Nations all along the KXL route in Alberta, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota and now Nebraska, will have committed to standing together to stop Keystone XL and the other three tar sands pipelines: Enbridge's Line 3 pipeline through Minnesota, Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain Expansion through British Columbia and TransCanada's Energy East.

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Collin Rees / Twitter

Massive Crowd Marches to Give 'KXL the Boot'

Pipeline Fighters from Nebraska and across the region marched through the streets of Lincoln, Nebraska Sunday—on the eve of a weeklong public hearing on the proposed Keystone XL pipeline before the Nebraska Public Service Commission, where Nebraska farmers and ranchers, the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska, Yankton Sioux Tribe, Bold Alliance and other environmental and citizen advocates will present evidence on why TransCanada's tar sands export pipeline is unnecessary and not in the public interest.

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Critical Keystone XL Testimony Denied in Last-Minute Decision

The Nebraska Public Service Commission (NPSC)—the Republican-dominated state board deciding the fate of TransCanada's long-delayed Keystone XL pipeline—have barred experts and homeowners from testifying over potential spills or whether the tar sands pipeline is even necessary during final hearings next week.

The Omaha World-Herald reports that former Lancaster County District Judge Karen Flowers, who was hired by NPSC to conduct the hearings, issued more than 30 rulings based on objections filed by TransCanada.

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Jane Kleeb. Mary Anne Andrei / Bold Nebraska

Meet Jane Kleeb: Nebraska’s Boldest Keystone XL Pipeline Fighter

By Nicole Greenfield

In the red state of Nebraska, people know Jane Kleeb for her politics.

She's a progressive Democrat in a land of Trump voters, after all. But people also know the 44-year-old Kleeb, a Florida native who moved to Nebraska in 2007 after marrying into a family of local homesteaders, as someone who can bridge the political divide and unify the most unlikely of groups.

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First "Solar XL" installation of USA-made solar panels in the path of the Keystone XL pipeline. Bold Nebraska / Facebook

Keystone XL Pipeline in Limbo: Developer May Not Build as Landowners Put Solar Array on Proposed Route

Keystone XL owner TransCanada told investors Friday that the company was still assessing demand for the project with oil companies, increasing speculation that the controversial pipeline may not see the light of day.

On an investor call, a TransCanada executive called for an "open season" on the Keystone project to attract investor bids, and said the company would assess interest and make a decision on the pipeline by November.

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Bold Nebraska / Twitter

'The Fight Is Not Over': Activist Building Solar Arrays to Block Keystone XL Route

By Ron Johnson

When President Donald Trump signed off on a presidential permit okaying the Keystone XL crude oil pipeline in March, it was a real blow to an environmental movement that had tasted victory over the dirty tar sands clunker back in 2015 when President Obama withdrew the permit for the project.

With Trump and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau united in their support of the pipeline, it seemed little could stand in the way of some 830,000 barrels of dirty tar sands fuel barreling down a 36-inch crude oil pipe from Hardisty, Alberta through Montana, South Dakota and Nebraska to export terminals in the Gulf of Mexico. The pipeline seemed destined to pass over, under, and through environmentally sensitive areas such as Nebraska's Sandhills, and put at risk the Ogallala Aquifer, one of the world's largest underground freshwater sources.

But not so fast.

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Donald Trump / Twitter

Trump Approves US-Mexico Pipeline 'That'll Go Right Under the Wall'

President Donald Trump has approved the construction of a new U.S.-Mexico pipeline that will go "right under" the controversial border wall.

According to The Hill, the New Burgos Pipeline will carry up to 108,000 barrels per day of refined petroleum products per day and cross the border between McAllen, Texas and Reynosa, Tamaulipas, Mexico. The project is a joint venture between NuStar Energy LP and PMI, an affiliate of Mexico's state-owned oil and gas company Petroléos Mexicanos.

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Art and Helen Tanderup with their daughter Vanessa Brand, their grandchildren Kyle and Amelia. Mary Anne Andrei / Bold Nebraska

Hear From the Bold Nebraskans Who Won't Give Up Fighting Keystone XL Pipeline

By Nicole Greenfield

When TransCanada began knocking on doors throughout Nebraska in 2008, most residents didn't know much about its Keystone XL pipeline or the dirty tar sands oil it would be transporting. The energy company was negotiating easements with local landowners in order to secure a route for its multibillion-dollar project—which would run north to south through the state, directly through the Ogallala Aquifer and across hundreds of Nebraskan rivers and streams. TransCanada threatened landowners with eminent domain if they didn't comply.

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