Quantcast

By Jorge Rodríguez

It was Thursday, Nov. 8, but the Mayan calendar marked the day as Wukub' Q'anil, or 7 Rabbit, a good day to ask for the rebirth of sterile lands and the fertility of all living beings.

Read More Show Less
Environmental Justice Foundation

By Daisy Brickhill, Environmental Justice Foundation

One of the key findings of the most recent UN report on the mounting perils of climate change is that rising temperatures pose a distinct risk to indigenous people, who are often small farmers, fishers or herders. The report noted that punishing storms, lasting drought and stifling heat threaten the lives and livelihoods of aboriginal groups from the Amazon rainforest to the Arctic Circle.

Read More Show Less

Four activists were arrested Monday after attempting to shut down an Enbridge pipeline near Grand Rapids, Minnesota, The Associated Press reported. The activists, who call themselves the Four Necessity Valve Turners and are affiliated with the Catholic Worker movement, said their actions were needed to address the urgent threat posed by climate change.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Steve Hillebrand / USFWS

By Tim Lydon

The Trump administration is barreling ahead with plans to drill for oil in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, the largest refuge in the country and an area of global ecological importance.

Read More Show Less
For nearly 10 years, the Unistoten camp has occupied hereditary lands directly in the path of the pipeline. Photo by Stephen Miller / YES! Magazine

By Zoë Ducklow

1. Where Is the Unist'ot'en blockade, and What's It About?

The gated checkpoint is on a forest service road about 120 kilometers southwest of Smithers in Unist'ot'en territory at the Morice River Bridge. Two natural gas pipelines are to cross the bridge to serve LNG terminals in Kitimat. Unist'ot'en is a clan within the Wet'suwet'en Nation.

Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs claim title to the land, based on their pre-Confederation occupation and the fact that they've never signed a treaty. Their claim has not been proven in court.

Read More Show Less
Andrew Harrer / Bloomberg Creative Photos / Getty Images

Tribal communities across the country are disproportionally reeling from the effects of the partial government shutdown, now in its 21st day.

As detailed in a sobering report from The New York Times, the Chippewa in Michigan are losing $100,000 a day to fund crucial health care programs, food pantries and employees' salaries; Snow-covered roads in Navajo Nation in New Mexico, Arizona and Utah remain unplowed because federal maintenance has suspended, trapping many people in their freezing homes; Police officers on the Bois Forte Indian Reservation in Minnesota are being forced to work without pay.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored