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Kimberly Guilfoyle (Co-Host): I don't think this is a deal that anybody should be crying about. Like we said, it's non-binding, and the United States is already a clean energy, oil and gas leader. So, we can keep doing what we're doing, we can keep reducing our emissions. Why would we in fact put ourselves at an economic disadvantage, giving and subsidizing an economic windfall to other countries, in sort of a climate redistribution of wealth scheme? It makes no sense to me.

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"Nobody really knows" if climate change is real, Donald Trump told Chris Wallace in an interview on Fox News Sunday, despite decades of established science.

In the interview, Trump defended his appointment of climate denier Scott Pruitt to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), expressing disdain for long EPA approval processes and implying "other countries are eating [the U.S.'s] lunch" due to excessive regulations.

The Paris agreement, Trump claims, is something he is "studying." He stated, "I don't want that agreement to put us at a competitive disadvantage with other countries." Trump also previewed "quick" decisions on the Keystone and Dakota Access pipelines once he enters office without offering specifics.

Watch here:

For a deeper dive:

News: Washington Post, Politico, Slate, CBS, CNN, Huffington Post, Mashable

Commentary: Gizmodo, Rhett Jones analysis

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

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On the Nov. 16 edition of Fox News' The O'Reilly Factor, host Bill O'Reilly said that President-elect Donald Trump "should accept the Paris treaty on climate to buy some goodwill overseas."

O'Reilly partially based this conclusion on the premise that the Paris agreement "doesn't really amount to much," but that view is contradicted by 376 members of the National Academy of Sciences, including 30 Nobel laureates, who say that the Paris agreement is a "vital first step" and that the U.S. withdrawing from it "would make it far more difficult to develop effective global strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change."

Reposted with permission from our media associate Media Matters for America.

By Sierra Club Political Committee

Donald Trump doubled down on his fringe climate change conspiracy theories on FOX news (watch at minute 4:00) late last night, confirming that he still believes it is a "hoax" when pressed by Bill O'Reilly.

Trump's continued dismissal of science would keep him isolated on the world stage, where every single world leader acknowledges the dangers and science of climate change (you can find and read quotes from every world leader here).

It's clear why Clinton pummels Trump by 38 points on the issue of climate change, the widest spread between them on any single issue, according to Gallup.

"If Donald Trump thinks he can negotiate with the hard facts of climate science, he's going to fail just as badly as he did in Atlantic City," Khalid Pitts, Sierra Club national political director, said. "His unhinged conspiracy theories denying science would embarrass our country around the world and endanger families across the country who are already feeling the pain of extreme droughts and storms fueled by the climate crisis."

Here's the transcript of Trump on FOX News:

O'REILLY: Okay. But did you ever call climate change a hoax?

TRUMP: Well, I might have because when I look at some of the things that are going on, in fact, if you look at Europe where they had their big summit a couple of years ago, where people were sending out emails, scientists practically calling it a hoax and they were laughing at it. So, yes, I probably did. I see what's going on and you see what's going on.

O'REILLY: Do you believe that that man-made fossil fuels and gases have eroded the environment so that the sun is more intense on Earth? Because that's the basic thing? Do you believe that's happening?

TRUMP: Well, they are saying man made and I say it could have a minor impact but nothing, nothing to what they're talking about.

Fox News declined to run an ad that calls out the network for refusing to acknowledge human-caused climate change.

The advertisement, sponsored by Friends of the Earth, shows a mock Fox News anchor reporting on extreme weather events while the newsroom slowly floods and then asks, "What will it take for Fox News to accept that humans are changing the climate?"

Fox News, meanwhile, agreed to run other ads by Partnership for Responsible Growth (PRG) that show conservative leaders talking about the need for climate action. PRG is also behind an ongoing 12-part climate change ad series in the Wall Street Journal.

For a deeper dive: Huffington Post, Grist

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

Media Matters for America

By Max Greenberg

Fox News cut away from President Obama's address on climate change in favor of a lawyer from a fossil fuel-funded think tank, who proceeded to dismiss the science indicating significant man-made global warming.

Yesterday, America Live interrupted Obama's speech, claiming that the President's statement that "the planet is warming and human activity is contributing to it" is "not the full story." Host Megyn Kelly then interviewed Chris Horner, a Competitive Enterprise Institute (CEI) and American Tradition Institute (ATI) fellow who often appears on Fox News to cast doubt on climate science.

Kelly granted Horner, a lawyer who has no scientific training, nearly as much air time (approximately four minutes and 10 seconds) as the leader of the free world (approximately four minutes and 35 seconds).

Kelly and Horner each claimed there has been "no warming" in the last 15 years, with the latter laughably declaring "the presidency deserves more than [warnings about climate change]." However, short-term temperature trends do not undermine the extensive evidence that the planet is getting warmer, largely due to human activity, at a rate that will have significant negative impacts.

Horner has spearheaded an ongoing effort to attack the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and hype the Obama administration's alleged "war on coal," even when no evidence backs him up. Both CEI and ATI have financial ties to Koch Industries and other fossil fuel interests.

According to Politico and Mediabistro, many other cable networks skipped the address, with the Weather Channel, Fox Business and Bloomberg among the only ones to carry the full speech.

Visit EcoWatch’s CLIMATE CHANGE page for more related news on this topic.

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