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A package of hot dog buns on July 10 in Orlando, Florida. Flowers Foods, Inc. is voluntarily recalling hamburger and hot dog buns and other bakery products due to the potential presence of small pieces of hard plastic. Paul Hennessy / NurPhoto / Getty Images

If you're aiming for a plastic-free cookout this summer, you might have to check in an unexpected place: your hamburger or hot dog buns.

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Trader Joe's store in North Brunswick Township, New Jersey. Michael Brochstein / SOPA Images / LightRocket / Getty Images

Packaged vegetables, including some sold under the Trader Joe's brand, were recalled due to possible Listeria contamination, CNN reported Tuesday.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Ragú Old World Style Traditional is one of three flavors named in a voluntary recall. Mike Mozart / CC BY 2.0

Spaghetti with plastic sauce? That's what you might be eating if you pour one of three flavors of Ragú sauce over your pasta.

Mizkan America, the food company that owns Ragú, announced Saturday that it was voluntarily recalling some Chunky Tomato Garlic & Onion, Old World Style Traditional and Old World Style Meat sauces because they might be contaminated with plastic fragments, The Today Show reported.

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USDA Food Safety Inspection Service inspector examines frozen meat in New Orleans. U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr

By Julia Conley

In an apparent effort to boost profits for meat manufacturers despite potential harms to food safety, the U.S. Department of Agriculture is reportedly planning to privatize inspections of beef slaughter plants.

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Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

After a year that saw the most Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) food safety investigations in at least 12 years, one of the most frightening impacts of the ongoing government shutdown has been the suspension of routine food safety investigations by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

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The FDA oversees about 80 percent of the nation's food supply. liz west / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

Americans only just survived the great romaine lettuce scare of 2018, and now the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has postponed routine domestic food safety inspections due to the partial federal government shutdown, the agency's commissioner said on Wednesday.

FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb tweeted that the agency usually conducts about 160 domestic inspections on manufacturing and food processing plants each week. About a third of that inventory are foods considered at high risk for causing foodborne illnesses, such as seafood, dairy products, fruits and vegetables. The ongoing government impasse, however, has postponed much of these inspections.

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haha21 / E+ / Getty Images

Anyone planning to serve shrimp with their champagne this New Year's Eve should check their receipts.

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Pexels

Last month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warned consumers not to eat any romaine lettuce, due to a large outbreak of E. coli contamination. Now, Adams Bros Farming Inc, a huge farm in California, is recalling more products that may have been contaminated in the same way.

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A recall of ready-made meat and poultry products included three Harris Teeter deli meals, like from this store in Apex, NC. Mike8411251995

A problem at a single food-processing plant in California has led to a massive recall impacting millions of pounds of pre-made salads and meals, more than two dozen chains and 13 food companies, USA Today reported Tuesday.

The problem started October 15 when McCain Foods USA recalled the Fire Roasted Black Bean Corn processed at its plant in Colton, California near Los Angeles for potential contamination with Listeria monocytogenes or Salmonella, Food Safety News reported. McCain Foods has since recalled all products from its Colton plant, which makes fire roasted, caramelized and sauteed frozen fruit and vegetables.

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Ground beef meat products at a grocery store in Fairfax, Virginia. USDA Photo by Lance Cheung

Two massive meat recalls were issued this week following outbreaks of food-borne illnesses.

Arizona-based meat producer JBS Tolleson Inc. recalled more than 6.5 million pounds of "various raw, non-intact beef products"—i.e. ground beef—that may be contaminated with salmonella, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced Thursday.

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Denise Taylor / Moment / Getty Images

By Dan Nosowitz

A report from the Office of the Inspector General found that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was not only slow to find problems in food production but that it often didn't take the right steps to correct violations and ensure that proper procedures were followed after violations were found. Foodborne illnesses, in some ways, are on the rise, and certainly, reporting of those violations are more visible than ever before. But there are still issues to correct.

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