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In the tropics, farmers often slash and burn forests to clear fertile land for crops, but a new method avoids that technique. Inga Foundation video

Rainforests are an important defense against climate change because they absorb carbon. But many are being destroyed on a massive scale.

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Freed slaves harvest land for their own profit on the former plantation of Confederate General Thomas Drayton. ©Corbis / Getty Images

By Julian Agyeman and Kofi Boone

Underlying the recent unrest sweeping U.S. cities over police brutality is a fundamental inequity in wealth, land and power that has circumscribed black lives since the end of slavery in the U.S.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Wine cultivation, typically associated with more southern slopes in France, Spain and Italy, is now taking off in places like Denmark, Sweden (pictured) and the United Kingdom. Jonathan Nackstrand / AFP / Getty Images

By Martin Kuebler

With hotter summers, severe storms and prolonged dry spells in the forecast, the outlook for Europe's farmers is daunting.

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A worker at a flower farm in Kiambu County, Kenya, piles up roses to be dumped on March 24, 2020. Patrick Meinhardt / AFP / Getty Images

By Peyton Fleming

Gerison Ndwiga, a small rural farmer in Kenya, felt the economic sting of COVID-19 just days after the government announced a curfew and travel restrictions in late March.

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A field of organic lettuce grows at a sustainable farm in California. thinkreaction / Getty Images

By Stephanie Hiller

When the coronavirus pandemic hit, the future of the Cannard Family Farm—whose organic vegetables supplied a single Berkeley restaurant—was looking stark.

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David Abazs, a farmer in northeastern Minnesota, has created a site-specific farming calendar based solely on natural events. youtu.be

As the climate warms, growing seasons are becoming more erratic. That uncertainty makes it harder for farmers to decide when to plant and harvest crops.

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Plants growing inside of a greenhouse nursery. pixinoo / Getty Images

Indoor farms can grow vegetables close to cities, where there are lots of people to feed.

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A woman shops at a local farmers' market during the COVID-19 crisis. BakiBG / Getty Images

By Paolo Mutia

As the COVID-19 pandemic sweeps across the globe, it has exposed and exacerbated how the corporate, industrialized food system is harming people and our planet.

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Sheep rest in the shade of sun-tracing photovoltaic panels installed at Solarpark Rodenäs on May 18, 2009 in Rodenas, Germany. Bert Bostelmann / Getty Images

By Lynn Freehill-Maye

When Jackie Augustine opens a chicken coop door one brisk spring morning in upstate New York, the hens bolt out like windup toys. Still, as their faint barnyard scent testifies, they aren't battery-powered but very much alive.

These are "solar chickens." At this local community egg cooperative, Geneva Peeps, the birds live with solar power all around them. Their hen house is built under photovoltaic panels, and even outside, they'll spend time underneath them, protected from sun, rain, and hawks.

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Alley farming at the Center for Urban Agriculture at Fairview Gardens allows for multiple crops to be planted alongside each other, maximizing the most efficient use of land. Citizen of the Planet / Education Images / Universal Images Group / Getty Images

By Tim Radford

Forget about organic farming: get the best out of the best cropland, return the rest to nature and still feed the world. It could work, say researchers.

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Janel Bodley tamps down soil around a freshly planted hemp clone at Wild Folk Farm in Benton. Ben McCanna / Portland Portland Press Herald / Getty Images

By Tom Levitt

The future of food doesn't have to include animals. At least that's what Miyoko Schinner believes. "A lot of farmers see us as a threat," Schinner said of her Californian plant-based dairy company, Miyoko's Creamery.

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