Quantcast
Double exposure of boys in ghost costumes at cemetery during Halloween in California. Cavan Images / Cavan / Getty Images

Much like Halloween, the environment can be terrifying and bring us joy at the same time. On All Hallows' Eve, let's revisit some of Earth's biggest ups and downs this October:

Read More Show Less
Max Pixel

The world of sport is not immune to the problem of plastic pollution. Stadiums and arenas can become filled with discarded cups, bottles and straws after sporting events. Sailors, swimmers and surfers are competing in oceans and waterways with an ever-growing presence of marine debris.

That's why on Monday the International Olympic Committee (IOC) announced plans to eradicate single-use plastics from the organization and its events around the world. What's more, seven major sporting bodies and representatives from more than 20 National Olympic Committees have joined the UN Environment's Clean Seas campaign to help bring awareness to marine litter and stem the plastic tide.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Andrew Hart/Flickr

Erik Solheim, the head of the United Nations' Environment Program, made an interesting point during a recent speech in New York: Companies, not taxpayers, should pay the costs of damaging the planet.

"The profit of destroying nature or polluting the planet is nearly always privatized, while the costs of polluting the planet or the cost of destroying ecosystems is nearly always socialized," Solheim said Monday, per Reuters, at the annual International Conference on Sustainable Development at Columbia University.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Sponsored