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Scott Pruitt at House Appropriations subcommittee hearing June 15. C-SPAN3

Both Democrats and Republicans in Congress said Thursday that the Trump administration's proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency cuts are too harsh.

In a House Appropriations subcommittee hearing with EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, lawmakers criticized the administration's plan to slash the agency's budget by 31 percent.

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Mustafa Santiago Ali. Hip Hop Caucus

The Trump administration is using a deliberate and systematic approach to undermine, weaken and disempower America's most vulnerable communities. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed budget cuts are a clear-cut example of this attack. The cuts will gravely reduce the ability to enhance communities across the U.S.—including low-income communities made up of white, black, Latino, indigenous and Asian Americans, in urban and rural settings alike.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Victoria Pickering

By Andy Rowell

"The Trump administration claims that it supports clean air and water, but its proposed FY 2018 Budget tells another story."

So begins the devastating 10 page analysis and critique of the proposed cuts to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), written by former staffers, called the Environmental Protection Network, which is made up of retired employees from Republican and Democratic administrations.

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By Elgie Holstein

The federal budget that the president proposes annually and Congress votes on is more than a collection of numbers. It tells us who the president is, what he stands for and what he cares about.

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The Trump administration proposed slashing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) funding by nearly 25 percent in a budget plan it sent to the agency Monday, agency sources told various outlets.

The proposal cuts the EPA's $8.1 billion budget by nearly $2 billion and would also potentially eliminate one-fifth of the agency's 15,000-person workforce, reducing the EPA to its funding and staffing levels of the late 1980s and early 1990s.

The White House is seeking an additional $54 billion in military spending by cutting funding across agencies, with the EPA reportedly one of the top targets for cuts. The administration will send its first submission to Congress by March 16 and could face backlash from lawmakers over the radical changes proposed at EPA.

For a deeper dive:

E&E, Politico, Bloomberg, The Hill, Vox, Huffington Post, Climate Central

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

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