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Democratic presidential candidate former U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke (D-TX) shakes hands at his first California campaign rally, held at Los Angeles Trade-Technical College, on April 27 in Los Angeles. Mario Tama / Getty Images

2020 Democratic presidential candidate and former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke announced a $5 trillion plan to fight climate change Monday. The plan is O'Rourke's first major policy announcement and one of the most detailed climate policies outlined in the primaries so far, Reuters reported.

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Beto O'Rourke speaks at a protest against President Donald Trump in El Paso in February. Christ Chavez / Getty Images

Beto O'Rourke announced he would run for President in 2020 Thursday, making the Texas Democrat the latest primary contender to list combating climate change as a major priority.

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person holding green leaf vegetable
Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash

Bringing your own reusable grocery bags when you go shopping is one of the easiest ways to cut down on your plastic consumption — according to the UN Environment Program, up to 5 trillion single-use plastic bags are used globally each year.

The most sustainable option is to use a bag you already have, whether it's an old tote or a laundry basket (thank TikTok for that idea). You can also make your own reusable grocery bags out of T-shirts. But if you'd rather purchase designated reusable grocery bags, here are our recommendations.
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Greenpeace

By Tim Donaghy

Time is running out for the oil and gas industry, and they know it. But delaying the transition to a clean energy economy even for a few more years means billions of dollars in profits for their investors. The 2018 elections show that even in their twilight years, oil cash can corrupt our democracy and block necessary progress on climate. The industry spent millions to kill off a Green New Deal-style initiative in Washington state and a Colorado initiative that would have increased the buffer between homes and schools and drilling areas.

When popular democracy threatened their profits, the oil industry opened up their checkbooks. And they'll run the same playbook on the fledgling Green New Deal too — unless we stop them.

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