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Indigenous knowledge has only recently begun to be seriously considered in international climate policy debates. FG Trade / Getty Images

By Ian Morse

For the first time last August, indigenous groups felt the global community was taking seriously their potential contributions to climate crisis policy.

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Aerial view of Lendbreen from the south-west. Light-grey areas (without lichen) have seen recent ice-melt. Arrows 1–3 indicate the locations of cairns visible on approach from Ottadalen. Arrow 4 indicates the location of a stone-built shelter. L. Pilø / CC BY 4.0

Global heating from the climate crisis is rapidly melting glaciers, revealing treasures underneath the ice from long ago. Retreating ice in Norway recently revealed a lost Viking mountain pass strewn with artifacts, according to a new study in the journal Antiquity.

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Archaeologists exploring the world's largest flooded cave—discovered last month just outside of Tulum, Mexico—have found an impressive treasure trove of relics.

The vast, 216-mile cave actually connects two of the largest flooded cave systems in the world, the 164-mile-long Sistema Sac Actun and the 52-mile-long Dos Ojos system. Aside from an extensive reserve of freshwater and rich biodiversity, the cave also contains an 11-mile-long, 66-food-deep cavern dubbed "the mother of all cenotes." Cenotes are natural pits, or underwater sinkholes, that are often holy sites in ancient Mayan culture.

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