Quantcast
Popular
A stretch of the Jari River inside the Renca Reserve in Amapá state. Daniel Beltrá / Greenpeace

Brazil Backs Off Controversial Plan to Open Amazon Forest to Mining

The Brazilian government announced Monday that it has reversed President Michel Temer's decree last month to open up a protected Amazon reserve to mining.

Temer's controversial proposal had allowed mining in the National Reserve of Copper and Associates (Renca), a 17,800-square-mile nature reserve the size of Switzerland that's known to be an essential carbon sink. The area is believed to be rich in gold, manganese, iron and copper.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Popular
Amazon pink river dolphin. Shutterstock

381 New Species Discovered in the Amazon

A new WWF and Mamirauá Institute for Sustainable Development report, released Aug. 30, reveals that a new animal or plant species is discovered in the Amazon every two days, the fastest rate to be observed this century. The findings come as huge parts of the forest are increasingly under threat, sparking further concern over the irreversible—and potentially catastrophic—consequences unsustainable policy and decision-making could have.

New Species of Vertebrates and Plants in the Amazon 2014-2015 details 381 new species that were discovered over 24 months, including 216 plants, 93 fish, 32 amphibians, 20 mammals (2 of which are fossils), 19 reptiles and 1 bird.

Keep reading... Show less
Energy
www.facebook.com

Total's Application to Drill Near Amazon Reef Rejected

Brazil's environmental agency (Ibama) rejected Tuesday the application for a license to drill in the mouth of the Amazon Basin by the French company Total (operating in a joint venture with BP). This is an important step towards defending the Amazon Reef; a unique and largely unexplored ecosystem—Total's closest block is only 8km away from the reef.

In a statement published Tuesday, Ibama's president, Suely Araujo, said that Total had not provided adequate information about the environmental impact of the project, making it impossible to grant the license. The company admits in their own Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) that there is a 30 percent probability of oil reaching the reef in case of a spill.

Keep reading... Show less
Food
Beef cattle awaiting slaughter in a corral. Fabio Nascimento

Study Links Most Amazon Deforestation to 128 Slaughterhouses

By Eduardo Pegurier, Translated by Bruno Moraes

Satellites are mechanical reporters of the Amazon deforestation process. By documenting the degradation and gaps created by the clear-cutting process over the years, they deliver the verdict: Two-thirds of the Amazon's deforested area has been turned into pastures.

From the ground, the cattle count reveals that the Amazon is home to more cattle than people. By 2016, the region's cattle numbers amounted to 85 million head, compared to a human population of 25 million—more than three cows per person. In the city of São Félix do Xingu, which contains the largest herd in Brazil, this proportion reaches 18 cows to 1 person.

Keep reading... Show less
Popular
Construction of the Belo Monte Dam project in Pará, Brazil in 2012. © Daniel Beltrá / Greenpeace

How New Dams in Amazon Put Entire World at Risk

By Tim Radford

What's considered by some to be clean energy could devastate the Amazon, according to new research. A massive increase in hydropower from a series of planned Amazon dams could harm the world's most important rainforest all the way from the slopes of the Andes to the Atlantic Ocean.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Insights

Amazon's Acquisition of Whole Foods: 'Higher Prices, Fewer Choices for Consumers'

Today, Amazon announced its acquisition of Whole Foods Market. Too few companies already exert outsized influence over our food choices. This is extreme consolidation of the food system in action, which will lead to higher prices, fewer choices for consumers and bigger profits for billionaires like its owner, Jeff Bezos.

Keep reading... Show less
Popular
Fish and coral in the Amazon reef. Greenpeace

Big Oil Faces Big Trouble in the Amazon

By Andy Rowell

We have known for years that the days of finding easy oil outside the Middle East are over. It means that the oil industry has to go into fragile ecological areas like the Arctic or exploit dirty unconventionals like the tar sands or shale gas.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Energy
Greenpeace

Amazing Underwater Photos Reveal Newly Discovered Brazilian Coral Reef

Greenpeace Brazil has captured the first underwater images of the Amazon Reef, a 9,500 km2 system of corals, sponges and rhodoliths located where the Amazon River meets the Atlantic Ocean—an area that the Brazilian government has opened for oil exploration.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored

mail-copy

Get EcoWatch in your inbox