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National Institude of Allergy and Infectious Disease

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warned Thursday of a drug-resistant strain of salmonella newport linked to the overuse of antibiotics in cattle farming.

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A man spreads pesticides on a plantation of vegetables in Rio de Janeiro Brazil. Ze Martinusso / Moment Open / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

Pointing to the deaths of more than half a billion bees in Brazil over a period of just four months, beekeepers, experts and activists are raising concerns about the soaring number of new pesticides greenlighted for use by the Brazilian government since far-right President Jair Bolsonaro took office in January — and the threat that it poses to pollinators, people and the planet.

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A coyote stands near a farmer's fence in Tennessee. Coyotes are a frequent target of controversial M-44 traps. EEI_Tony / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Trump's U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has reversed a decision made last week to reauthorize the use of deadly cyanide traps used to kill wild animals that threaten agriculture, the Associated Press reported Thursday.

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Aerial view of cattle pasture land created from tropical rainforest in Western Mato Grosso State, Western Brazil. Luiz Claudio Marigo / Nature Picture Library / Getty Images Plus

One-quarter of world's tropical land could disappear at the end of the century if global consumption of meat and dairy isn't curbed, resulting in the widespread loss of species and their habitats.

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Farm land bordering an industrial area in South Africa. John Hogg / World Bank Photo Collection

Food production must change drastically and immediately in order to sustain ourselves through the ongoing climate crisis, says a new United Nations report put together by more than 100 experts from 52 different countries, according to The New York Times.

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Mason Phillips and Maltby sit amidst an edible flower garden planted in a borrowed backyard in Ottawa, Canada. Madeleine Maltby

By Lindsay Campbell

In 2015, Madeleine Maltby began knocking on neighborhood doors in Canada's capital city, Ottawa, with a simple proposal. In exchange for a backyard, the residents would let her grow a garden full of crops with a percentage they could enjoy.

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blueflames / E+ / Getty Images

By Jake Johnson

The rapid and dangerous decline of the insect population in the United States — often called an "insect apocalypse" by scientists — has largely been driven by an increase in the toxicity of U.S. agriculture caused by the use of neonicotinoid pesticides, according to a study published Tuesday in the journal PLOS One.

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One of Michael Kirk's five sheep grazing fields in Vermont at Shelburne Vineyard. Samuel Rheaume

By Lindsay Campbell

They're an unlikely pair, but Vermont friends Ethan Joseph and Michael Kirk have managed to devise a partnership that combines their two separate working worlds.

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Agriculture and other land uses now account for nearly a quarter of greenhouse gas emissions. Chesapaeake Bay Program / Flickr

By Julia Conley

When some of the world's top scientists conclude an international summit in Geneva next week, they are expected to call for a major shift to vegetarian diets around the world in order to keep the warming of the globe under 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.

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uacescomm / Flickr / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

By Aleksandra Arcipowska, Emily Mangan, You Lyu and Richard Waite

Agriculture provides a livelihood for billions of people every day and feeds all of us. Yet food production has significant impacts on the environment through deforestation and water pollution. It's also a major contributor of greenhouse gas emissions.

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A field of crops grows in Brawley, California. Florence Low / California Department of Water Resources

By Tara Lohan

Despite the warning signs — climate change, biodiversity loss, depleted soils and a shrinking supply of cheap energy — we continue to push along with an economy fueled by perpetual growth on a finite planet.

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