Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Taco Bell Cheese Dip Recalled Over Botulism Fears

Food
Taco Bell Cheese Dip Recalled Over Botulism Fears
An example of the 15 ounce cheese dips recalled over botulism fears. FDA

Kraft Heinz announced Tuesday it was voluntarily recalling around 7,000 cases of Taco Bell Salsa Con Queso Mild Cheese Dip over concerns they could become infected with the bacteria that causes botulism.

The company said the dip in the affected cases had begun to separate, which could create conditions that allow the bacterium Clostridium botulinum (C. botulinum) to grow.


The affected dip comes in 15 ounce glass jars and have use by dates ranging from October 31, 2018 to January 23, 2019.

"We deeply regret this situation and apologize to any consumers we have disappointed," the company said in its announcement.

Kraft Heinz confirmed that no illnesses had been reported. They urged customers who had purchased the product not to eat it, but to return it to the store for a full refund or call the company at 1-800-310-3704.

The cheese dip recall comes the same week as popular crackers Ritz and Goldfish were caught up in a recall due to the use of whey powder contaminated with salmonella.

The affected cheese dip product was only distributed in the U.S.

Botulism is a potentially fatal form of food poisoning that attacks the nerves, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Symptoms begin with weakness of the eye, face, mouth and throat muscles. This can spread to the neck, arms, torso and legs, and even the muscles that control breathing, which is what makes the disease sometimes fatal.

Botulism is actually caused by spores the bacteria make to protect themselves The spores do not usually make people sick unless encouraged to grow in certain environments that are low oxygen, low sugar, low acid, low salt, within a certain temperature range and that contain a certain amount of water.

Improperly home-canned foods can provide such an environment, and most foodborne cases of botulism come from homemade products, according to the CDC.

For example, in 2016, the most recent year for which data exists, the most extensive botulism outbreak was linked to homemade alcohol produced in a Mississippi prison and the second from home-canned goods, according to the National Botulism Surveillance Summary for 2016. There were 29 confirmed foodborne cases that year overall.

Other commercial recalls linked to botulism in 2018 included "Gerard & Dominique Seafoods" brand Cold Smoked Wild Coho Salmon Lox in Washington, pork soup from Guymon Extracts in Oklahoma and Imperial Caviar and Seafood brand and VIP Caviar Club brand whitefish and salmon roe in Canada, Food Safety News reported.

Milkyway from Segara Anak - Rinjani Mountain. Abdul Azis / Moment / Getty Images

By Dirk Lorenzen

2021 begins as a year of Mars. Although our red planetary neighbor isn't as prominent as it was last autumn, it is still noticeable with its characteristic reddish color in the evening sky until the end of April. In early March, Mars shines close to the star cluster Pleiades in the constellation Taurus.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Michael Svoboda, Ph.D.

Despite a journey to this moment even more treacherous than expected, Americans now have a fresh opportunity to act, decisively, on climate change.

The authors of the many new books released in just the past few months (or scheduled to be published soon) seem to have anticipated this pivotal moment.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Marsh Creek in north-central California is the site of restoration project that will increase residents' access to their river. Amy Merrill

By Katy Neusteter

The Biden-Harris transition team identified COVID-19, economic recovery, racial equity and climate change as its top priorities. Rivers are the through-line linking all of them. The fact is, healthy rivers can no longer be separated into the "nice-to-have" column of environmental progress. Rivers and streams provide more than 60 percent of our drinking water — and a clear path toward public health, a strong economy, a more just society and greater resilience to the impacts of the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
A Brood X cicada in 2004. Pmjacoby / CC BY-SA 3.0

Fifteen states are in for an unusually noisy spring.

Read More Show Less
A creative depiction of bigfoot in a forest. Nisian Hughes / Stone / Getty Images

Deep in the woods, a hairy, ape-like man is said to be living a quiet and secluded life. While some deny the creature's existence, others spend their lives trying to prove it.

Read More Show Less