Quantcast

Sweet and Juicy Benefits of 20 Natural Disease Fighters

Food

We know that eating lots of fresh fruits and veggies is good for our health, but what specific benefits do we get from different sorts of produce? This infographic takes a look at 20 popular fruits and their health benefits.

Of course, just choosing fresh produce is only part of the battle, right? We also need to take into account the effects of pesticide residues on our health. The best choice is to choose organic produce, but if you can’t do that, there are some fruits that are more important to buy organic than others.

The Environmental Working Group (EWG) has lists of which fruits and veggies have the most and the fewest pesticide residues when they’re conventionally grown. These lists–“The Dirty Dozen” and “The Clean Fifteen”–are great references if you can’t get all of your produce organically. I’ve cross referenced the fruits in this graphic with those lists, and below the infographic you’ll find which are Dirty Dozen fruits and which are in the Clean Fifteen.

Infographic via Daily Infographic.

Fruits on the Dirty Dozen List

If your grocery budget or organic produce selection is limited, these are the fruits to focus on buying organic. According to analysis by the EWG, these have the highest pesticide residues.

  • apples
  • cherry tomatoes
  • grapes
  • peaches
  • strawberries

Fruits on the Clean Fifteen List

If you can’t get all organic fruit, these are the ones with the fewest pesticide residues.

  • avocado
  • grapefruit
  • kiwi
  • mango
  • papaya
  • pineapple

What’s your favorite fresh fruit? I’m a mango gal! Seriously, I could eat mango all day long.

 ——–

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

5 Ways to ‘Eat Real’ on a Budget

6 Spring Foods to Buy at the Farmers Market

10 Ways to Teach Your Child to Eat Well

——–

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Teen activist Greta Thunberg delivered a talking-to to members of Congress Tuesday during a meeting of the Senate Climate Change Task Force after politicians praised her and other youth activists for their efforts and asked their advice on how to fight climate change.

Read More Show Less
Ten feet of water flooded 20 percent of this Minot, North Dakota neighborhood in June 2011. DVIDSHUB / CC BY 2.0

By Jared Brey

When Hurricane Michael tore through the Florida panhandle last October, it killed at least 43 people, caused an estimated $25 billion in damage and destroyed thousands of homes.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
A protestor holds up her hand covered with fake oil during a demonstration on the U.C. Berkeley campus in May 2010. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

The University of California system will dump all of its investments from fossil fuels, as the Associated Press reported. The university system controls over $84 billion between its pension fund and its endowment. However, the announcement about its investments is not aimed to please activists.

Read More Show Less
Forest fire continues to blaze in Indonesesia on Sept. 18. WAHYUDI / AFP / Getty Images

Nearly 200 people have been arrested in Indonesia over their possible connections to the massive wildfires raging in the nation's forest, officials said this week.

Read More Show Less

By Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala

World leaders have a formidable task: setting a course to save our future. The extreme weather made more frequent and severe by climate change is here. This spring, devastating cyclones impacted 3 million people in Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe. Record heatwaves are hitting Europe and other regions — this July was the hottest month in modern record globally. Much of India is again suffering severe drought.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Covering Climate Now / YouTube screenshot

By Mark Hertsgaard

The United Nations Secretary General says that he is counting on public pressure to compel governments to take much stronger action against what he calls the climate change "emergency."

Read More Show Less
A new rule that ends limits for hog slaughtering speeds could increase animal suffering, advocates warn. kickers / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Trump's U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) finalized a new hog slaughtering rule Tuesday that environmental and food safety advocates warn could harm animals, plant workers and public health, Reuters reported.

Read More Show Less
Prehistoric and historic walrus skulls, tusks and bone fragments often wash ashore on the southern coast of Snæfellsnes peninsula in Iceland. Hilmar J. Malmquist

A unique subpopulation of ancient walrus in Iceland was likely hunted to extinction by Vikings shortly after arrival to the region, according to new research.

Read More Show Less