Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Sustainable Food and Farming Film Competition: Submissions Due Feb. 3

Food

The Real Food Media Contest is looking for short films with big ideas. They are seeking captivating short films about food, farming and sustainability that spark action and inspire change.

“This contest gives an opportunity for filmmakers to generate powerful storytelling about food, farming and sustainability,” says Anna Lappé, director of the Real Food Media Project. “The more great minds we have thinking about these issues and producing creative ways to deliver the messages, the better.”

Films should range in length from 30-seconds to four-minutes, using one of four different style prompts—Documentary Style, Experimental, Advocacy Style, Wildcard. Documentary style can profile "food heroes," highlight a place that’s being revived through "community groups, local policy makers, or activists building healthy food and farming networks," or show how local food can "take a bite out of climate change."

The second is experimental style. They are looking for a film that can “bring to life the concept: the hands that feed us.” The third is advocacy and should focus on producing safer, more sustainable food, protecting human health, helping raise a healthy generation, keeping fields and farms safe for workers, or come up with your own advocacy pitch.

The fourth category is a wildcard, which can include just about anything: “Come up with your own prompt about sustainable food and farming. Funny. Serious. Artsy. Make it worth our time and you might join the winners’ circle.” Click here for submission guidelines.

“There’s incredible interest today in where our food comes from and how it is produced—and this generation has so much to say about it. The contest provides a great platform for original voices that can help make a change by delivering this increasingly important information,” says journalist and contest judge Michael Pollan.

The contest winner will receive $5,000 and have their film shown at the Food & Farm Film Fest in San Francisco in April. Submission deadline is Feb. 3 at 9 p.m. EST.

Contest judges include:

  • Padma Lakshmi, cookbook author, actress, model and television host 
  • Michael Pollan, journalist and author, Omnivore’s Dilemma 
  • Robert Kenner, Academy Award-nominated director, “Food Inc.”
  • Eric Schlosser, journalist and author, Fast Food Nation 
  • Johanna Blakley, managing director, Norman Lear Center, USC
  • Byron Hurt, director and producer, “Soul Food Junkies”
  • Alice Waters, Chez Panisse and Chez Panisse Foundation 
  • Keri Putnam, executive director of the Sundance Institute 
  • The Jamie Oliver Food Foundation (USA)
  • Emily Zweber, organic farmer

The Real Food Media Project is a collaborative initiative using online movies and a web-based action center along with grassroots events around the country to spread the stories of sustainable food and farming. The project is a program of Corporate Accountability International and is brought to you by Anna Lappé and Food MythBusters. The Real Food Media Project is partnering with School Ambassadors who help connect students who may be interested in participating in the contest. 

“This contest is a great opportunity to support the food movement and independent filmmaking. The two are a perfect fit,” says Eric Schlosser, author of Fast Food Nation and a contest judge.

Visit EcoWatch’s FOOD page for more related news on this topic.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A scenic view of West Papua. Reza Fakhrudin / Pexels

By Arkilaus Kladit

My name is Arkilaus Kladit. I'm from the Knasaimos-Tehit tribe in South Sorong Regency, West Papua Province, Indonesia. For decades my tribe has been fighting to protect our forests from outsiders who want to log it or clear it for palm oil. For my people, the forest is our mother and our best friend. Everything we need to survive comes from the forest: food, medicines, building materials, and there are many sacred sites in the forest.

Read More Show Less
Everyone overthinks their lives or options every once in a while. Some people, however, can't stop the wheels and halt their train of thoughts. Peter Griffith / Getty Images

By Farah Aqel

Overthinkers are people who are buried in their own obsessive thoughts. Imagine being in a large maze where each turn leads into an even deeper and knottier tangle of catastrophic, distressing events — that is what it feels like to them when they think about the issues that confront them.

Read More Show Less
A newly developed catalyst would transform carbon dioxide from power plants and other sources into ethanol. DWalker44 / E+ / Getty Images

Researchers at the Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a cheap, efficient way to convert carbon dioxide into liquid fuel, potentially reducing the amount of new carbon dioxide pumped into the atmosphere.

Read More Show Less
Eureka Sound on Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic taken by NASA's Operation IceBridge in 2014. NASA / Michael Studinger / Flickr / CC by 2.0

A 4,000-year-old ice shelf in the Canadian Arctic has collapsed into the sea, leaving Canada without any fully intact ice shelves, Reuters reported. The Milne Ice Shelf lost more than 40 percent of its area in just two days at the end of July, said researchers who monitored its collapse.

Read More Show Less
Teachers and activists attend a protest hosted by Chicago Teachers Union in Chicago, Illinois on Aug. 3, 2020 to demand classroom safety measures as schools debate reopening. KAMIL KRZACZYNSKI / AFP via Getty Images

The coronavirus cases surging around the U.S. are often carried by kids, raising fears that the reopening of schools will be delayed and calling into question the wisdom of school districts that have reopened already.

Read More Show Less
Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern holds up COVID-19 alert levels during a press conference at Parliament on March 21, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. Hagen Hopkins / Getty Images

By Michael Baker, Amanda Kvalsvig and Nick Wilson

On Sunday, New Zealand marked 100 days without community transmission of COVID-19.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Medics with Austin-Travis County EMS transport a nursing home resident with coronavirus symptoms on Aug. 3, 2020 in Austin, Texas. John Moore / Getty Images

The U.S. passed five million coronavirus cases on Sunday, according to data from Johns Hopkins University, just 17 days after it hit the four-million case mark.

Read More Show Less