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Arvin Goods x Bureo Launch Sustainable Skate Socks

Arvin Goods x Bureo

Fashion can be incredibly wasteful. But two eco-minded companies have joined forces to help tackle the growing issue of textile and plastic waste.

Sustainable basics brand Arvin Goods today announced a limited-issue collaboration with Bureo, which famously makes skateboards and sunglasses from discarded fishing nets.


Together, they've rolled out an ocean-themed line of skate socks made from upcycled cotton and recycled plastic bottles.

"As a brand that puts sustainability first, we're stoked to be collaborating with Bureo," said Arvin Goods co-founder and creative director Harry Fricker in a statement provided to EcoWatch. "Their mission to recycle ocean-bound plastics is inspiring and aligns with our objective to upcycle textile waste. Together, we're offering an eco-friendly sock that's just as keen on style, design and functionality as it is on sustainable practices."

Arvin Goods x Bureo

Founded in 2017, Arvin Goods makes their products with closed-loop production practices, meaning they use textile scraps and upcycled materials. That way, their socks and underwear don't rely on water- and energy-dependent cotton farms or production facilities. Here's another cool thing they do—once you wear out your Arvin socks, you can donate them back to the company so the pair can be upcycled and continue their loop.

Their partnership with Bureo is fitting. Since 2013, the California-based company has collected more than 200,000 kilograms of fishing nets from 26 participating communities in Chile. Bureo takes these nets and transforms them into recycled nylon pellets called NetPlus to use for manufacturing. Lost fishing gear, also known as ghost nets, is not only a major source of ocean plastic pollution, it can entangle and kill scores of marine animals.

"Like us, Arvin is set out to make the world a cleaner, healthier place," Bureo said in a statement to EcoWatch. "We both exist to offer sustainable end-of-life solutions for discarded materials that harm the environments that we love. We believe that collaborating with Arvin embodies our shared commitment of sustainably manufacturing premium goods."

The sustainable skate socks are available at www.arvingoods.com and www.bureo.co. They come in size M-L and retails for $20 per two-pack, which consists of gym- and crew-style socks.

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