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'These Guys Are Complete Idiots'

Animals
'These Guys Are Complete Idiots'

By Zachary Toliver

Two men who "surfed" on top of a beached sea turtle in Queensland, Australia, are this week's biggest idiots. Authorities are now investigating the photo of their cruel stunt and they could face a hefty fine—in addition to the wrath of the Internet.

The photo—in which the men are seen drinking and standing on top of the turtle—was reportedly posted to Facebook by 26-year-old Ricky Rogers with a caption that read, "Surfed a tortoise on zee weekend.. gnarly duddddeeeee [sic]." After receiving thousands of outrage-filled comments, Rogers made his account private.

The Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Queensland spokesperson Michael Beatty didn't hold back when discussing the photo with the Fraser Coast Chronicle: "These guys are just complete idiots—there's no way they should be doing what they were doing."

Beatty also said that the men could have seriously injured the turtle, but it's unknown whether the animal was alive or dead at the time that the photo was taken.

According to the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service, the men could have to pay a fine of up to $20,000 for their cruelty.

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