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6 Things You Can Do Right Now to Help Stop Trump’s Supreme Court Nominee

Politics
The Supreme Court of the United States on Monday morning July 09, 2018. Matt McClain / The Washington Post via Getty Images

By Courtney Hight

Donald Trump announced that he will be nominating another extremist judge to the Supreme Court—Brett Kavanaugh. If the Senate lets Trump successfully install Kavanaugh to fill this seat, the Court will rubber stamp Trump's agenda for decades to come—no longer functioning as a check against his abuses of power and attacks on women's rights and bedrock clean air and clean water laws, which is needed now more than ever.


As members for life of the highest court in the country, Supreme Court justices have the solemn responsibility to be fair, even-handed, and uphold the sanctity of our laws and the values of our Constitution, and to keep faith with the letter and spirit of the nation's core public health, environmental, civil rights, and labor laws.

The Supreme Court must protect the rights of women, workers, the LGBTQ community, immigrants, people of color and other vulnerable communities. The Court must protect access to healthcare for millions, secure clean air and clean water for all, ensure legally-mandated action to tackle the climate crisis, uphold the right to vote, and safeguard the very strength of our democracy. All of those things could be threatened if a justice is confirmed who sides with the rich and powerful over the people.

Hand-picked by the Heritage Foundation and Federalist Society, Brett Kavanaugh is not a moderate pick nor will he challenge Trump—he is exactly the type of judicial extremist Trump wants to help him roll back our progress, gut Roe v. Wade, strip individuals of their voting rights, attack equality under the law, gut our environmental laws and repeal affordable healthcare.

While on the DC Circuit Court, Kavanaugh routinely sided with polluters, criticized the Clean Power Plan, argued against aspects of the mercury rule, and attempted to strike down the EPA's Cross-State Air Pollution Rule.

But we aren't going to stand by while Trump tries to turn back the clock on our rights. We've proven that our resistance is sustainable, and we will continue to fight back. Together, we will continue to rise up with our allies across the country to ensure that our courts remain fair and uphold democracy. And there are lots of things you can do right now to respond to Trump and keep up the #resistance. Here are just six:

1. Call your U.S. Senators. Urge them to stop Trump's nominee in their tracks. Call them at 218-209-4082.

2. Tweet and post on Facebook. We all know Trump loves to tweet. Let's make sure he hears our resistance by using the hashtags #SaveSCOTUS and #StopKavanaugh. Same with Facebook. Let's get #SaveSCOTUS and #StopKavanaugh trending so Trump and his advisors know just how big a mistake they're making.

3. Find a #saveSCOTUS event near you. Dozens of organizations are coming together for a Supreme Court week of action this week. We'll be heading to the home state offices of our Senators to make sure our voices are heard. Find an event near you or create your own: https://savescotus.indivisible.org/sierraclub/

4. Join the #Resist Summer Challenge. It may be summertime, but our movement to Resist Trump will not take a vacation. As we face increasing attacks on our people and our environment from this administration, we must recommit ourselves to resisting Trump and everything he stands for. Join us at sc.org/ResistSummerChallenge.

5. Help us fight back against the Trump administration. We're fighting back to stop the efforts of Trump and his nominees to derail everything we've achieved. Your support will help the Sierra Club protect wildlife, wild places and fragile ecosystems, reduce dependence on fossil fuels, and build a clean energy future. Raise your voice with us. Donate today so we can continue to resist.

6. Add your name and commit to fighting for nominees who uphold the Constitution. Keep faith with the letter and spirit of the nation's core laws, and support justice for all Americans. Together with you, the Sierra Club is committed to rising up with our allies across the country to ensure that our courts remain fair and uphold democracy. Join us here.

Courtney Hight is the director of Sierra Club's democracy program.

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