Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Rare and Pregnant Sumatran Tiger Killed by Hunter's Trap

Animals
Rare and Pregnant Sumatran Tiger Killed by Hunter's Trap
Less than 400 Sumatran tigers currently exist. Steve Wilson / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

One of the world's rarest tigers was killed this week after being caught in a pig trap on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, Agence France Presse reported, citing local officials.

What's worse, the critically endangered Sumatran tiger was pregnant with two cubs when it died and was expected to give birth in two weeks, local reports said.


The death is a major setback to the species, as fewer than 400 Sumatran tigers currently exist, according to WWF estimates.

The tigress was seen Tuesday caught in a pig trap set by a hunter in Muara Lembu village in the Riau province, AFP said. Officers immediately traveled to the site but found that the animal was missing.

The following day, officers searched the area again and found the tiger dead near a ravine with a wire from the trap wrapped around its body.

A necropsy showed that the wire had ruptured the animal's kidney and led to its death, The Jakarta Post reported. The tiger was approximately 3.5 to 5 years old.

Authorities said Thursday they arrested a man—identified only as "E"—in connection with the tiger's death. He said he used the traps to catch pigs and denied killing the tiger intentionally.

"He admitted that he had set up several traps in various areas," the head of the Riau Natural Resources Conservation Agency told The Jakarta Post. "I told E that he was supposed to wait around the trap to prevent other animals from being harmed if he actually wanted to catch a pig. If a tiger passed by, then he should shoo it away. What would happen if it was his kid instead who was trapped?"

If convicted, E could face 5 years in prison and a Rp 100 million (US$6,708) fine under Indonesian law, The Jakarta Post said.

There are roughly 3,890 tigers remaining in the wild, according to WWF. As EcoWatch previously mentioned, threats faced by these iconic big cats include poaching for their pelts, illegal rainforest destruction for palm oil production and habitat loss due to climate change, such as coastal erosion due to sea level rise.

A grizzly bear killed an outdoor guide in a rare attack near Yellowstone Park. William Campbell / Corbis / Getty Images

A backcountry guide has died after being mauled by a grizzly bear near Yellowstone National Park.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) re-introduces the Green New Deal in Washington, D.C. on April 20, 2021. Mandel Ngan / AFP / Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

In the latest of a flurry of proposed Green New Deal legislation, Reps. Cori Bush and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Monday introduced the Green New Deal for Cities Act of 2021, a $1 trillion plan to "tackle the environmental injustices that are making us and our children sick, costing us our homes, and destroying our planet."

Read More Show Less
Trending
Offshore oil and gas drillers have left more than 18,000 miles of pipelines at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico. Drew Angerer / Getty Images

Offshore oil and gas drillers have discarded and abandoned more than 18,000 miles of pipelines on the floor of the Gulf of Mexico since the 1960s, a report from the Government Accountability Office says.

Read More Show Less
Concerns over drinking polluted water top a recent Gallup poll on environmental threats. sonsam / Getty Images

Americans are most worried about water quality compared to other environmental issues, a new Gallup survey finds.

Read More Show Less
The black cherries of Coffea stenophylla. E. Couturon / IRD, Author provided

By Aaron P Davis

The world loves coffee. More precisely, it loves arabica coffee. From the smell of its freshly ground beans through to the very last sip, arabica is a sensory delight.

Robusta, the other mainstream coffee crop species, is almost as widely traded as arabica, but it falls short on flavor. Robusta is mainly used for instant coffee and blends, while arabica is the preserve of discerning baristas and expensive espressos.

Read More Show Less