Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Study Finds Canned Drinks Expose Fetuses to Potentially Cancerous Chemical

Health + Wellness
Study Finds Canned Drinks Expose Fetuses to Potentially Cancerous Chemical

In a new study, researchers believe what men are fed during the fetal stage may leave them more susceptible to prostate cancer, which is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the U.S., reports TreeHugger.

Findings conclude BPA, an estrogenic compound, permanently reprograms a fetus’ stem cells potentially leading to increased prostate cancer risks.
Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

The study, published last month, found that early fetal exposure to low levels of a chemical compound called bisphenol (BPA) could explain how 15 percent of U.S. men are diagnosed with prostate cancer at some point in their lives. 

BPA, known to be a gender-bending endocrine disrupter that acts as an estrogen, is used to make polycarbonate plastics and can be found in aluminum beverage cans, most food cans, canned infant formula, dental sealants, paper receipts and epoxy-lined beer cans.

It's estimated that more than 90 percent of Americans carry traces of BPA in their bodies, so that there is almost “universal fetal exposure” to BPA. And, It’s already known that men’s gradual and natural rise of estrogen levels are partly responsible for causing prostate cancer.

To try and establish a connection between fetal BPA exposure and future prostate cancer, researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago implanted stem cells from deceased young men into lab mice. Their finding were reported in Environmental Health News:

“When the mice were fed BPA by mouth for the first two weeks of life, 33 percent of the stem cells had cancerous or precancerous lesions later in life. Forty-five percent of the cells that were exposed to BPA before and after mice implantation developed precancerous or cancerous lesions later. In comparison, only 12 percent of the mice not exposed to BPA during development had cancer or precancerous lesions later in life.”

Other findings conclude BPA, an estrogenic compound, permanently reprograms a fetus’ stem cells, according to TreeHugger. Those stem cells are then used to replenish organs throughout the course of a person’s life, and if those stem cells are particularly sensitive to estrogen as a result of past exposure, they will pass on that sensitivity to prostate tissue later on in life.

While this study cannot perfectly replicate human physiology, it is still considered to be “some of the strongest and most convincing evidence to date linking early life BPA exposure and cancer,” according to Heather Patisaul from the University of North Carolina.

Visit EcoWatch’s FOOD and HEALTH pages for more related news on this topic.

Pexels

By Jessica Corbett

A new study is shedding light on just how much ice could be lost around Antarctica if the international community fails to urgently rein in planet-heating emissions, bolstering arguments for bolder climate policies.

The study, published Thursday in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, found that over a third of the area of all Antarctic ice shelves — including 67% of area on the Antarctic Peninsula — could be at risk of collapsing if global temperatures soar to 4°C above pre-industrial levels.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Valley of the Gods in the heart of Bears Ears National Monument. Mint Images / Getty Images

By Sharon Buccino

This week, Secretary Haaland chose a visit to Bears Ears National Monument as her first trip as Interior Secretary. She is spending three days in Bluff, Utah, a small town just outside the monument, listening to representatives of the five tribes who first proposed its designation to President Obama in 2015. This is the same town where former Secretary Sally Jewell spent several hours at a public hearing in July 2016 before recommending the monument's designation to President Obama.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Pexels

By Anthony Richardson, Chhaya Chaudhary, David Schoeman, and Mark John Costello

The tropical water at the equator is renowned for having the richest diversity of marine life on Earth, with vibrant coral reefs and large aggregations of tunas, sea turtles, manta rays and whale sharks. The number of marine species naturally tapers off as you head towards the poles.

Read More Show Less
"Secrets of the Whales" is a new series that will start streaming on Disney+ on Earth Day. Disney+

In celebration of Earth Day, a star-studded cast is giving fans a rare glimpse into the secret lives of some of the planet's most majestic animals: whales. In "Secrets of the Whales," a four-part documentary series by renowned National Geographic Photographer and Explorer Brian Skerry and Executive Producer James Cameron, viewers plunge deep into the lives and worlds of five different whale species.

Read More Show Less
Spring is an excellent time to begin bird watching in earnest. Eugenio Marongiu / Cultura / Getty Images

The coronavirus has isolated many of us in our homes this year. We've been forced to slow down a little, maybe looking out our windows, becoming more in tune with the rhythms of our yards. Perhaps we've begun to notice more, like the birds hopping around in the bushes out back, wondering (maybe for the first time) what they are.

Read More Show Less