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Stop the Arctic Oil Disaster Plan

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Stop the Arctic Oil Disaster Plan

Defenders of Wildlife

Imagine it. Millions of gallons of oil spilled in one of the most fragile marine environments—home to polar bears, walrus, bowhead whales and more.

What's worse, there's currently no adequate plan for cleaning up a disaster of this magnitude in the remote and treacherous Arctic waters.

So why is the Obama administration pushing forward with risky drilling in this fragile habitat?

Urge federal officials not to forget the Deepwater Horizon disaster—and to stop their reckless pursuit of risky offshore oil drilling.

Right now, the Obama administration is proposing a 5-year offshore leasing plan that puts our shores at risk of another Deepwater Horizon Oil Disaster. The plan would open the door to increased drilling in remote stretches of fragile Arctic waters that America's struggling polar bears depend on for survival.

But it's not just the sensitive seas of the Arctic. In the Gulf of Mexico, the Obama administration wants to continue to expand risky drilling before it has completely assessed the causes of the 2010 Gulf oil disaster and its effects on sea turtles, dolphins and other wildlife that live there.

Speak out now for sea turtles, polar bears and other marine wildlife by urging the Obama administration to stop risky and dangerous drilling off our coasts.

After millions of barrels of oil flowed into the Gulf of Mexico from the Deepwater Horizon well—killing thousands of birds and hundreds of sea turtles—President Obama promised that drilling under his watch would be cleaner and safer. But Gulf drilling continues with little meaningful environmental review—and his administration is setting the stage for increased drilling in the fragile Arctic Ocean.

Our marine wildlife needs your voice. Take action today before the Monday, Jan. 9 deadline

For more information, click here.

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