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Stephen Hawking + 374 Top Scientists: Trump's Climate Denial Would Have 'Severe and Long-Lasting' Consequences

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During his final UN General Assembly address, President Obama pressed for a "sense of urgency" in bringing the Paris agreement into force and for scaling up ambition on climate action. He also called for more clean energy investment in developing countries.


According to the United Nations, 30 countries are expected to formally join the Paris agreement during Wednesday's event at the UN.

A group of 375 members of the National Academy of Sciences, including 30 Nobel Prize winners, warned that a U.S. withdrawal from the Paris agreement would hurt the nation's international credibility and undermine the climate pact.

In an open letter, the scientists voiced concern about Donald Trump, saying, "It is of great concern that the Republican nominee for president has advocated U.S. withdrawal from the Paris accord." The U.S. should continue to be a global leader on climate no matter the result of the election, the scientists advocated.

"Climate change is a known fact, and today's letter speaks to the disastrous threat that those who deny science pose to our country and the world," Sierra Club Legislative Director Melinda Pierce said. "In signing the Paris climate agreement, more than 190 countries recognized the need to act, yet America now faces the possibility of electing a candidate who would tear up this accord and steer us straight into further climate disruption."

For a deeper dive:

Politico Pro, NPR, Climate Home, VOA News, New York Times, Guardian, AP

News: Reuters, New York Times, Mercury News, Minnesota Public Radio, Buzzfeed, Huffington Post, Times New Herald, Xinhua

Commentary: Guardian, John Abraham column

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

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