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Stephen Colbert: U.S. Needs New National Bird in Face of Climate Change

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Stephen Colbert: U.S. Needs New National Bird in Face of Climate Change

Comedy Central host Stephen Colbert was thrown in a tizzy by an Audubon Society report released this week which found half of America's bird species could be endangered thanks to shrinking and shifting habitats caused by climate change.

Stephen Colbert reacts to a report released by the National Audubon Society this week. Photo credit: Comedy Central

"I'm not a scientist," he announced, parodying the disclaimer used by climate deniers, "but I've never bought into all the alarmism around climate change. Why fear change? Maybe Earth is just going through puberty. ... Folks, these are scare tactics from the loon loving loons at the Audobon Society."

But it distressed him to learn that many official state birds might be pushed out of those states entirely. "Suddenly the hundreds of hours I spent memorizing state trivia seems like a total waste of time," he said.

Worse, he says, is the fact that the study says America's national bird, the bald-eagle might have its habibat decreased by 75 percent by 2080.

"How can that be?" he wonders. "I thought its native territory was discount patriotic tee shirts, and based on the sizes I've seen at Walmart, that territory is expanding."

But he's got a nomination for a replacement national bird! Watch the video to find out what it is.

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