Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Stephen Colbert: This Is the Road to the White House

Politics
Stephen Colbert: This Is the Road to the White House

It was a big weekend in presidential politics and while eight candidates remain in this race, it looks as though a few more will drop out after the next big round—Super Tuesday. Stephen Colbert, host of The Late Show, had plenty to say about the results on the show Monday night.

"This is the road to the White House," Colbert announced. "[And] once the votes were counted in the Nevada, many were asking, could Hillary Clinton recover from such a debilitating victory." Clinton barely beat Bernie Sanders, but left Nevada with roughly the same number of delegates as him. "Yes, just like in the Super Bowl when the victorious Carolina Panthers left with roughly the same number of points as Denver," compared Colbert.

On Saturday, the Republicans also had their primary in South Carolina. Donald Trump has been the predicted winner for weeks. Although many in the media weren't celebrating Trump's big win as much as he was. The GOP establishment was hoping second-place winner Marco Rubio would eventually be the Republican nominee. And, while Ted Cruz came in third, he claimed that he and Rubio actually tied for second.

"This primary had more winners than a little league awards banquet, [but] possibly the biggest winner was the man who won, Donald Trump," Colbert said. "So now, the obvious question is 'will he ever not win?' Yes, Trump is unstoppable, like Godzilla with less foreign policy experience! I'll admit, I just thought he was doing it to promote his reality show or sell more steaks, it never occurred to me that his end game was to be president!"

Watch here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

4 Reasons Ted Cruz Is More Dangerous Than Donald Trump

Colbert’s Hilarious Take on the Pope vs. Trump Feud

Bernie Sanders: ‘If We Can Rebuild Villages in Iraq, We Can Damn Well Rebuild Flint, Michigan’

Watch John Oliver Slam Republicans for Attempting to Block Scalia and Access to the Ballot Box

A Botswana elephant stands in a body of water. Geschenkpanda / Pixabay

Toxins in water produced by cyanobacteria was likely responsible for more than 300 elephant deaths in Botswana this year, the country's wildlife department announced on Monday.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Activists gather in John Marshall Park for the Global Climate Strike protests on September 20, 2019 in Washington, DC. Samuel Corum / Getty Images

By Alexandra Villarreal

As West coast wildfires color the skies dystopian red and orange and an aggressive hurricane season batters the U.S. Gulf coast, college students are demanding their schools take bold action to address the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A portion of roadway is flooded in Corpus Christi, Texas on Sept. 20, 2020 due to storm surge from Tropical Storm Beta in the Gulf of Mexico. Matt Pierce / iStock Editorial / Getty Images Plus

The National Hurricane Center has run out of names for tropical storms this year and has now moved on to the Greek alphabet during an extremely active hurricane season. Late Monday night, Tropical Storm Beta became the ninth named storm to make landfall. That's the first time so many named storms have made landfall since 1916, when Woodrow Wilson was president, according to NBC News.

Read More Show Less
Colette Pichon Battle, attorney, founder, and executive director of the Gulf Coast Center for Law & Policy. Colette Pichon Battle

By Karen L. Smith-Janssen

Colette Pichon Battle gave a December 2019 TEDWomen Talk on the stark realities of climate change displacement, and people took notice. The video racked up a million views in about two weeks. The attorney, founder, and executive director of the Gulf Coast Center for Law & Policy (GCCLP) advocates for climate justice in communities of color. Confronted with evidence showing how her own South Louisiana coastal home of Bayou Liberty will be lost to flooding in coming years, the 2019 Obama Fellow dedicates herself to helping others still reeling from the impacts of Katrina face the heavy toll that climate change has taken—and will take—on their lives and homelands. Her work focuses on strengthening multiracial coalitions, advocating for federal, state, and local disaster mitigation measures, and redirecting resources toward Black communities across the Gulf South.

Read More Show Less
A palm tree plantation in Malaysia. Yann Arthus-Bertrand / Getty Images Plus

Between 2000 and 2013, Earth lost an area of undisturbed ecosystems roughly the size of Mexico.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch