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Stephen Colbert Compares 2016 Election to the Hunger Games

Politics
Stephen Colbert Compares 2016 Election to the Hunger Games

"As a voter, I am sad to lose Joe Biden," says Stephen Colbert on the Late Show. "But, I mean, being a candidate sucks. It's an ugly, nasty battle with a single bloody survivor. It's like the Hunger Games. No it's more than that. It's the Hungry for Power Games."

He then launches into a recurring segment where he impersonates the eccentric host of the Hunger Games, Caesar Flickerman. Donning a bright blue wig with a glass of champagne in hand, Colbert honors the "fallen" presidential candidates, Jim Webb and Lincoln Chafee, who have dropped out of the race.

Stanley Tucci, who plays Caesar Flickerman in the blockbuster movie series, even makes an appearance. Check it out:

Colbert also discusses how Hillary Clinton came out looking great after the 10-hour long hearing on Benghazi:

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