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Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Stefanie Spear

Stefanie Penn Spear is the founder, executive director and editor of EcoWatch. She has been publishing environmental news for more than two decades. Spear works to unite the voice of the grassroots environmental movement and mobilize millions of people to engage in democracy to protect human health and the environment. She seeks to motivate individuals to become engaged in their community, adopt sustainable practices and support strong environmental policy.

For more than six years, EcoWatch has been servicing the sustainability community of Ohio through its bimontly newspaper EcoWatch Journal, with a readership of more than 100,000 per issue. In 2011, EcoWatch in partnership with Waterkeeper Alliance expanded its services to promote the work of more than 1,000 grassroots environmental organizations worldwide through an online news service website EcoWatch.org.

Spear is president of Expedite Renewable Energy, a company that develops solar and wind projects in Ohio and helps companies through the many steps of investing in renewable energy. She works on energy policy on the local, state and federal level to help transition the U.S. to relying on cleaner, renewable sources of power.

Spear chairs the Green Commission for the Village of Moreland Hills, and co-chairs the Advanced Energy Generation committee for Sustainable Cleveland 2019.  She is on the advisory board for GreenCityBlueLake Institute, Tri-C’s Green Academy and Center for Sustainability, and Sunflower Solutions.

Reindeers at their winter location in northern Sweden on Feb. 4, 2020, near Ornskoldsvik. JONATHAN NACKSTRAND / AFP via Getty Images

Sweden's reindeer have a problem. In winter, they feed on lichens buried beneath the snow. But the climate crisis is making this difficult. Warmer temperatures mean moisture sometimes falls as rain instead of snow. When the air refreezes, a layer of ice forms between the reindeer and their meal, forcing them to wander further in search of ideal conditions. And sometimes, this means crossing busy roads.

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The Great Lakes, including Lake Michigan, experienced some of their warmest temperatures on record in the summer of 2020. Ken Ilio / Moment / Getty Images

Heatwaves are not just distinct to the land. A recent study found lakes are susceptible to temperature rise too, causing "lake heatwaves," The Independent reported.

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Starfish might appear simple creatures, but the way these animals' distinctive biology evolved was, until recently, unknown. FangXiaNuo / Getty Images

By Aaron W Hunter

A chance discovery of a beautifully preserved fossil in the desert landscape of Morocco has solved one of the great mysteries of biology and paleontology: how starfish evolved their arms.

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U.S. President Joe Biden sits in the Oval Office as he signs a series of orders at the White House in Washington, D.C. on January 20, 2021. Jim Watson / AFP / Getty Images

President Joe Biden officially took office Wednesday, and immediately set to work reversing some of former President Donald Trump's environmental policies.

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Erik McGregor / LightRocket / Getty Images

In many schools, the study of climate change is limited to the science. But at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, students in one class also learn how to take climate action.

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