Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Starbucks Adds Coconut Milk to Its Menu, But Should You Order It?

Food
Starbucks Adds Coconut Milk to Its Menu, But Should You Order It?

Starbucks rolls out a non-dairy, certified vegan alternative today by adding Starbucks Single Origin Sumatra Coconut Milk to its menu at all U.S. locations. "Providing a non-dairy alternative to dairy and soy is the second most requested customer idea of all time from MyStarbucksIdea.com, generating more than 84,000 votes,” according to Starbucks.

Starbucks Single Origin Sumatra Coconut Milk was added today to all Starbucks U.S. locations. Photo credit: Starbucks

While coconut milk is a popular dairy alternative for those who are vegan, lactose intolerant, paleo or allergic to other non-dairy milk alternatives like soy and almond, coconut has raised red flags for its incredibly high saturated fat content. However, recent studies show no correlation between saturated fat and heart disease, helping coconut gain mass-market appeal.

In fact, coconut oil (which makes up much of the fat content in coconut milk) offers a number of health benefits. It can protect against various infections, improve blood lipids by raising HDL (good) cholesterol, increase energy expenditure, improve satiety and help you lose weight, in addition to being a great hand and body cream.

So will you find the same benefits with a coconut milk latte from Starbucks? Due to the highly processed formulation of Starbucks coconut milk, the answer may be no.

Not to be confused with coconut water, coconut milk is a thick, creamy white liquid traditionally made by simply processing and straining grated coconut milk and water. (Find a recipe to make your own two-ingredient coconut milk at home here). Starbucks’ processed coconut milk, however, contains more than a dozen ingredients, including sugar, salt and thickeners. According to a product photo posted to Reddit, the full list of Starbucks coconut milk ingredients are:

filtered water, coconut cream, sugar, tricalcium phosphate, carageenan, gellan gum, sea salt, natural flavor, vitamin A, palmitate, vitamin D2, vitamin B12

Bottom line: More non-dairy milk alternatives are an excellent addition to the Starbucks menu, and pure coconut milk is a healthy option. Unfortunately, the highly processed blend at Starbucks may not be the best choice.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Study Finds Lower Pesticide Levels in People Who Eat Organic Produce

USDA Approves GMO Arctic Apples Despite Opposition

Why I am a Pegan—or Paleo-Vegan—and Why You Should Be Too

A grim new assessment of the world's flora and fungi has found that two-fifths of its species are at risk of extinction as humans encroach on the natural world, as The Guardian reported. That puts the number of species at risk near 140,000.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Flowers like bladderwort have changed their UV pigment levels in response to the climate crisis. Jean and Fred / CC BY 2.0

As human activity transforms the atmosphere, flowers are changing their colors.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A factory in Newark, N.J. emits smoke in the shadow of NYC on January 18, 2018. Kena Betancur / VIEWpress / Corbis / Getty Images

By Sharon Zhang

Back in March, when the pandemic had just planted its roots in the U.S., President Donald Trump directed the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to do something devastating: The agency was to indefinitely and cruelly suspend environmental rule enforcement. The EPA complied, and for just under half a year, it provided over 3,000 waivers that granted facilities clemency from state-level environmental rule compliance.

Read More Show Less
A meteoroid skims the earth's atmosphere on Sept. 22, 2020. European Space Agency

A rare celestial event was caught on camera last week when a meteoroid "bounced" off Earth's atmosphere and veered back into space.

Read More Show Less
A captive elephant is seen at Howletts Wild Animal Park in Littlebourne, England. Suvodeb Banerjee / Flickr / CC by 2.0

By Bob Jacobs

Hanako, a female Asian elephant, lived in a tiny concrete enclosure at Japan's Inokashira Park Zoo for more than 60 years, often in chains, with no stimulation. In the wild, elephants live in herds, with close family ties. Hanako was solitary for the last decade of her life.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch