Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Who Lives in a Pineapple Under the Sea and is Latest Advocate for Amazon Reef?

Popular
www.facebook.com

By Mal Chadwick

BP is at it again.

The company that devastated the Gulf of Mexico with its Deepwater Horizon disaster wants to drill for oil near the pristine Amazon Reef. What could possibly go wrong?


Home to pink corals, sunset-colored fish and more than 60 species of sea sponge, the reef has been described as an "underwater rainforest" near the mouth of the Amazon River—and we're only just discovering how special it is.

But if BP's extreme drilling causes a spill, it could spell disaster for the reef and the wider area. We can't let this happen.

So starting this week, we're turning up the pressure on BP—working together to defend the reef from risky, spill-prone oil drilling.

And now we've got some help from an unlikely source. The Amazon Reef has a new champion—a celebrity advocate who'll stand up to BP and fight for justice.

His name? Spongebob Squarepants.

As a lifelong coral reef resident, Spongebob knows all about caring for our oceans—and he's got plenty of campaigning experience too. And with more than 60 species of sea sponge living on the Amazon Reef, for him this is personal.

So check out the video and share it far and wide—it's a fun way to introduce new people to the campaign, and definitely not your run-of-the-mill Greenpeace message!

But the video is just the start. Over the next few weeks, we'll work together to expose BP's reckless drilling plan, and put pressure on them to leave the Amazon Reef in peace.

If you're in, make sure you join the campaign at amazonreefs.org.

Producing avocado and almond crops is having a detrimental effect on bees. Molly Aaker / Getty Images

At first glance, you wouldn't think avocados and almonds could harm bees; but a closer look at how these popular crops are produced reveals their potentially detrimental effect on pollinators.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

An oblique (left) and dorsal (right) photo of a female Pharohylaeus lactiferous. J.B. Dorey / Journal of Hymenoptera Research

Australia is one of the most biodiverse countries in the world. It is home to more than 7% of all the world's plant and animal species, many of which are endemic. One such species, the Pharohylaeus lactiferus bee, was recently rediscovered after spending nearly 100 years out of sight from humans.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Scientists believe sharks use bioluminescence to camouflage themselves. Jérôme Mallefet

Scientists have newly photographed three species of shark that can glow in the dark, according to a study published in Frontiers in Marine Science last month.

Read More Show Less
A FedEx truck travels along Interstate 10 by the San Gorgonio Pass Wind Farm near Palm Springs, California on Feb. 27, 2019. Robert Alexander / Getty Images

FedEx's entire parcel pickup and delivery fleet will become 100 percent electric by 2040, according to a statement released Wednesday. The ambitious plan includes checkpoints, such as aiming for 50 percent electric vehicles by 2025.

Read More Show Less
Empty freeways, such as this one in LA, were a common sight during COVID-19 lockdowns in spring 2020. vlvart / Getty Images

Lockdown measures to stop the spread of the coronavirus pandemic had the added benefit of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by around seven percent, or 2.6 billion metric tons, in 2020.

Read More Show Less