Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Special Interests Attempt to Derail Energy Efficiency in Federal Buildings

Climate
Special Interests Attempt to Derail Energy Efficiency in Federal Buildings

Sierra Club

Yesterday the Sierra Club and the American Institute of Architects (AIA) released a new print ad opposing the Hoeven-Manchin amendment—a special interest-backed attempt through to repeal energy conservation requirements for new federal buildings.

As a proposed addition to the otherwise strong and broadly supported Energy Savings and Industrial Competitiveness Act, introduced by Sen. Shaheen (D-NH) and Sen. Portman (R-OH), the amendment would repeal a key provision—section 433 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007—which sets carbon pollution reduction targets for new federal buildings. The bill is expected to come to a floor vote in the coming days.

Overall, buildings contributed nearly half of U.S. CO2 emissions in 2010. Section 433 ensures that starting in 2030 new federal buildings, and those that undergo significant renovations, be carbon-neutral, in order to reduce their carbon footprint.

“To build a clean energy future, we have to start with buildings—we cannot adequately address the climate crisis without making our buildings cleaner and more efficient,” said Dave Hamilton, clean energy director for the Beyond Coal campaign.

“Yet, Big Oil and Gas is trying to repeal strong, established laws and undermine clean energy innovation to stifle competition and pad profits at the expense of American families," he continued. "The Senate should reject this deplorable backdoor attack on clean energy innovation and climate progress.”

As an alternative to the Hoeven-Manchin amendment, Sen. Whitehouse (D-RI) has introduced an amendment to clarify section 433 while retaining the overall purpose of the provision, which was passed into law in 2007.

“The future—and present—of the built environment around the world is energy efficiency,” said Paul Mendelsohn, vice president, government and community relations at the AIA.

“If the U.S. wants to be on the cutting edge of the job-creating innovation, the federal government should lead by drawing the blueprints," Mendelsohn continued. "The Whitehouse amendment presents a reasonable compromise that will do just that."

Visit EcoWatch’s CLIMATE CHANGE page for more related news on this topic.

——–

An electric car at an eVgo charging station in a parking lot in Dublin, California on June 20, 2018. Smith Collection / Gado / Getty Images

California Governor Gavin Newsom signed an executive order Wednesday that would ban the sale of new cars in California that run only on gasoline by the year 2035. The bid to reduce emissions and combat the climate crisis would make California the first state to ban the sale of new cars with internal combustion engines, according to POLITICO.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A "trash tsunami" has washed ashore on the beaches of Honduras, endangering both wildlife and the local economy.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Long-finned pilot whales are seen during a 1998 stranding in Marion Bay in Tasmania, Australia. Auscape / Universal Images Group / Getty Images

More long-finned pilot whales were found stranded today on beaches in Tasmania, Australia. About 500 whales have become stranded, including at least 380 that have died, the AP reported. It is the largest mass stranding in Australia's recorded history.

Read More Show Less
A protest in solidarity with the Wetʼsuwetʼen's anti-pipeline struggle, at Canada House in Trafalgar Square on March 1, 2020 in London, England. More than 200 environmental groups had their Facebook accounts suspended days before an online solidarity protest. Ollie Millington / Getty Images

Facebook suspended more than 200 accounts belonging to environmental and Indigenous groups Saturday, casting doubt on the company's stated commitments to addressing the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
The Västra Hamnen neighborhood in Malmö, Sweden, runs on renewable energy. Tomas Ottosson / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

By Harry Kretchmer

By 2030, almost a third of all the energy consumed in the European Union must come from renewable sources, according to binding targets agreed in 2018. Sweden is helping lead the way.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch