Quantcast

Incredible Glass House Honors Nature

Popular

Forest lovers will appreciate the beautiful modern glass home recently built in a secluded glade near Madrid. Penelas Architects' Hidden Pavilion was completed in 2016 in a quiet forest just northwest of Spain's capital city.

The Hidden Pavilion is a minimalist but attractive two-story home designed to accommodate human residents and surrounding trees. The second floor is carefully angled to allow room for a 200-year-old holm oak so it can continue its life unimpeded. The structure also includes openings in the roof terrace and veranda that allow younger trees to spread out.

The 753-square-foot Hidden Pavilion has a bedroom, bathroom, patio and large closet on the first floor, and a kitchen and dining area on the second floor. The floors are connected by a spiral staircase. The basic structure of the house is made of steel and the interior areas that aren't glass are cherry wood.

The walls are mostly made of glass to encourage immersion in nature and there are currently no window coverings.

While the forest encompasses much of the house, a trip to the rooftop veranda offers panoramic views of the local environment. In addition to the open roof, there is a spacious second-floor veranda that perches over a small waterfall. Chimney-like tubes in the ceiling encourage light to travel into the home, which is mostly shaded.

The Hidden Pavilion was designed "as a secluded place for meditation," and "to instill a sense of nature," Design Boom shared.

Construction began on the Hidden Pavilion "some time ago," head architect Dr. José Luis Esteban Penelas told New Atlas. It paused in 2010 and was completed in 2016.

Penelas appears to have achieved a delicate balance between the needs of human habitation and a desire to honor and appreciate the natural environment surrounding the home. Penelas Architects is based out of Madrid and Penelas teaches at the European University of Madrid. His other notable projects include Juan Carlos Park and the plaza for the Reina Sofia Modern Art Museum.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Marlene Cimons

Scientist Aaswath Raman long has been keen on discovering new sources of clean energy by creating novel materials that can make use of heat and light.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By SaVanna Shoemaker, MS, RDN, LD

The aloe vera plant is a succulent that stores water in its leaves in the form of a gel.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Attendees seen at the Inaugural Indigenous Peoples Day Celebration at Los Angeles Grand Park on Oct. 8, 2018 in Los Angeles. Chelsea Guglielmino / Getty Images

By Malinda Maynor Lowery

Increasingly, Columbus Day is giving people pause.

Read More Show Less
Westend61 / Getty Images

By Brianna Elliott, RD

Hunger is your body's natural cue that it needs more food.

Read More Show Less
Young activists and their supporters rally for action on climate change on Sept. 20 in New York City. Drew Angerer / Getty Images

By Jeff Turrentine

More than 58 million people currently living in the U.S. — 17 percent of the population — are of Latin-American descent. By 2065 that percentage is expected to rise to nearly a quarter. Hardly a monolith, this diverse group includes people with roots in dozens of countries; they or their ancestors might have arrived here at any point between the 1500s and today. They differ culturally, linguistically and politically.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Thu Thai Thanh / EyeEm / Getty Images

By Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

Commonly consumed vegetables, such as spinach, lettuce, peppers, carrots, and cabbage, provide abundant nutrients and flavors. It's no wonder that they're among the most popular varieties worldwide.

Read More Show Less
Petrochemical facilities in the Houston ship channel. Roy Luck / CC BY 2.0

By Tara Lohan

Prigi Arisandi, who founded the environmental group Ecological Observation and Wetlands Conservation, picks through a heap of worn plastic packaging in Mojokerto, Indonesia. Reading the labels, he calls out where the trash originated: the United States, Australia, New Zealand, United Kingdom, Canada. The logos range from Nestlé to Bob's Red Mill, Starbucks to Dunkin Donuts.

The trash of rich nations has become the burden of poorer countries.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Lisa Wartenberg, MFA, RD, LD

Caffeine's popularity as a natural stimulant is unparalleled.

Read More Show Less