Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Some Events Linked to Paris Climate Talks to Be Canceled

Climate
Some Events Linked to Paris Climate Talks to Be Canceled

More news has come out of France today concerning the upcoming climate talks in Paris, which starts in two weeks. Prime Minister Manuel Valls said on Monday, three days after Paris was hit by terrorist attacks that killed 129 people, that France will limit the UN climate summit in Paris to core negotiations and cancel planned marches and concerts.

According to Reuters, Prime Minister Valls said no foreign leaders had asked France to postpone the Nov. 30 to Dec. 11 summit, which aims to map out a global accord to limit greenhouse gas emissions, a move which would amount to "abdicating to the terrorists."

"A series of demonstrations planned will not take place and it will be reduced to the negotiations ... a lot of concerts and festivities will be canceled," Valls told RTL radio.

A Global Climate March was planned for the eve of the summit, Nov. 29, to tout the message, "keep fossil fuels in the ground and finance a just transition to 100% renewable energy by 2050." The march hoped to attract hundreds of thousands of people to pressure world leaders to sign a binding agreement that would cut greenhouse gas emissions to avoid catastrophic consequences of global warming.

Environmental activists are due to meet Monday to rethink plans for a march and mainstream groups say they will respect any bans, decreed under emergency powers in France, Reuters said.

E&E News reported that “Climate Action Network [CAN] international, which represents hundreds of environmental groups dedicated to climate change, said they will meet on Monday to discuss next steps.” A CAN statement said:

The coalition organizing the Global Climate March on November 29th is meeting on Monday to discuss ways forward. We hope this weekend will offer time for reflection, mourning and hope and that we can come together as a community on Monday when more information may be in hand. The climate movement around the world stands for peace and justice. To our core, we oppose hateful actions like those in Paris last night and in Beirut earlier this week.

On Saturday night, in response to the Paris attacks, presidential candidate and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders said during CBS's Democratic debate, “Climate change is directly related to the growth of terrorism and if we do not get our act together and listen to what the scientists say, you’re going to see countries all over the world, this is what the CIA says, they’re going to be struggling over limited amounts of water, limited amounts of land to grow their crops and you’re going to see all kinds of international conflict. But, of course international terrorism is major issue that we have to address today.”

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Bernie Sanders: ‘Climate Change Is Directly Related to the Growth of Terrorism’

Bill McKibben: We Must Keep Brewing Gale-Force Winds to Shift Political Landscape

10 Photos Show the Reality of a Warming Planet

Mark Ruffalo Is ‘Berning Up’

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists' "Doomsday Clock" — an estimate of how close humanity is to the apocalypse — remains at 100 seconds to zero for 2021. Eva Hambach / AFP / Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

One hundred seconds to midnight. That's how close humanity is to the apocalypse, and it's as close as the world has ever been, according to Wednesday's annual announcement from the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, a group that has been running its "Doomsday Clock" since the early years of the nuclear age in 1947.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The 13th North Atlantic right whale calf with their mother off Wassaw Island, Georgia on Jan. 19, 2010. @GeorgiaWild, under NOAA permit #20556

North Atlantic right whales are in serious trouble, but there is hope. A total of 14 new calves of the extremely endangered species have been spotted this winter between Florida and North Carolina.

Read More Show Less

Trending

There are new lifestyle "medicines" that are free that doctors could be prescribing for all their patients. Marko Geber / Getty Images

By Yoram Vodovotz and Michael Parkinson

The majority of Americans are stressed, sleep-deprived and overweight and suffer from largely preventable lifestyle diseases such as heart disease, cancer, stroke and diabetes. Being overweight or obese contributes to the 50% of adults who suffer high blood pressure, 10% with diabetes and additional 35% with pre-diabetes. And the costs are unaffordable and growing. About 90% of the nearly $4 trillion Americans spend annually for health care in the U.S. is for chronic diseases and mental health conditions. But there are new lifestyle "medicines" that are free that doctors could be prescribing for all their patients.

Read More Show Less
Candles spell out, "Fight for 1 point 5" in front of the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, Germany on Dec. 11, 2020, in reference to 1.5°C of Earth's warming. The event was organized by the Fridays for Future climate movement. Sean Gallup / Getty Images

Taking an unconventional approach to conduct the largest-ever poll on climate change, the United Nations' Development Program and the University of Oxford surveyed 1.2 million people across 50 countries from October to December of 2020 through ads distributed in mobile gaming apps.

Read More Show Less
A monarch butterfly is perched next to an adult caterpillar on a milkweed plant, the only plant the monarch will lay eggs on and the caterpillar will eat. Cathy Keifer / Getty Images

By Tara Lohan

Fall used to be the time when millions of monarch butterflies in North America would journey upwards of 2,000 miles to warmer winter habitat.

Read More Show Less