Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Solidarity Rallies Abound in Support of Tar Sands Blockade

Energy

EcoWatch

At lunchtime yesterday in Washington, DC, nearly 50 people gathered in front of the American Petroleum Institute (API) to bring attention to the increased violence against peaceful protesters in Winnsboro, Texas, and the need to halt the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline.

"This protest and protests like these are important so that the people who work at the API know that the resistances against the pipeline is across this country. Yet, more importantly it shows the people in Texas that they are supported nationwide," said Marc Smith from Washington, DC.

Solidarity rally in Denton, TX.

Over the past couple of weeks the Tar Sands Blockade has been slowing down the building of the Keystone XL Pipeline in Texas. This group of courageous activists have been putting their bodies on the line. Their direct action campaign to halt Keystone XL has gained a huge surge of momentum, as they have launched numerous actions to halt the construction.

Tar Sands Blockade has successfully held the tree blockade for three entire weeks despite renewed levels of repression. One activist was arrested after defending a family farm and delaying Keystone XL construction for most of a day. Another was arrested for sitting on a 40-foot pole and blocking clear-cutting operations for two entire days. Actress and activist Daryl Hannah got arrested with landowner Eleanor Fairchild while defending Fairchild Farms from Keystone XL construction.

Solidarity rallies were also held on Monday in New York, San Francisco, and Austin and Denton, Texas.

Visit EcoWatch’s KEYSTONE XL page for more related news on this topic.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Disinfectants and cleaners claiming to sanitize against the novel coronavirus have started to flood the market.
Natthawat / Moment / Getty Images

Disinfectants and cleaners claiming to sanitize against the novel coronavirus have started to flood the market, raising concerns for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which threatened legal recourse against retailers selling unregistered products, according to The New York Times.

Read More Show Less
A customer packs groceries in reusable bags at a NYC supermarket on March 1, 2020. Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images

The global coronavirus pandemic has thrown our daily routine into disarray. Billions are housebound, social contact is off-limits and an invisible virus makes up look at the outside world with suspicion. No surprise, then, that sustainability and the climate movement aren't exactly a priority for many these days.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Ingredients are displayed for the Old School Pinto Beans from the Decolonize Your Diet cookbook by Luz Calvo and Catriona Rueda Esquibel. Melissa Renwick / Toronto Star via Getty Images

By Molly Matthews Multedo

Livestock farming contributes to global warming, so eating less meat can be better for the climate.

Read More Show Less
Locals board up their shops in Vanuatu's capital of Port Vila on April 6, 2020 ahead of Tropical Cyclone Harold. PHILIPPE CARILLO / AFP via Getty Images

The most powerful extreme weather event of 2020 lashed the Pacific nation of Vanuatu Monday as it tries to protect itself from the new coronavirus.

Read More Show Less

Two rare Malayan tiger cubs born at the Bronx Zoo in January 2016, Nadia and Azul made their public debut in September 2016. Nadia has now tested positive for the new coronavirus, and Azul has shown symptoms.

A tiger at the Bronx Zoo is believed to be the first animal in the U.S. and the first tiger in the world to test positive for the new coronavirus.

Read More Show Less