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SkyTruth Testifies Before Congress on Fracking Disclosure Rules

Energy

SkyTruth

SkyTruth founder and president John Amos testified last week before the U.S. House Natural Resources Committee regarding Skytruth's work on hydraulic fracturing (fracking) chemical disclosure, and the Bureau of Land Management's decision on regulating drilling and fracking on 750 million acres of public and Tribal lands.

The hearing was entitled "DOI Hydraulic Fracturing Rule: A Recipe for Government Waste, Duplication and Delay." SkyTruth's testimony addressed the need for public disclosure of chemicals used in fracking. This should be accomplished on a user-friendly, government operated website that encourages public use and sharing of the data without any restrictions, and allows easy aggregation and bulk download of the data.

Read the full written testimony.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

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