Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Six Women Scale Europe's Tallest Skyscraper to Protest Shell's Arctic Drilling

Climate

Climbers from Greenpeace successfully scaled the Shard in London, Europe's tallest skyscraper, yesterday in protest against Shell's plans to drill for oil in the Arctic.

Six women began a bold “free climb" to the top of the building at 4:20 a.m., yesterday morning.

When they reached the summit, at a height of 310 meters, they raised a huge banner proclaiming, "Save the Arctic."

Greenpeace say the Shard was chosen because it sits in the middle of Shell's three headquarter offices.

The building itself is modeled on a shard of ice, representing the pristine Arctic environment that is being threatened by attempts to exploit the region for fossil fuels.

Greenpeace and 1 million of their supporters are calling for a moratorium ban on oil and gas exploration in the Arctic as the region opens up due to increasing ice melt caused by global warming.

They hoped to get 1000 more signatures on their Arctic petition for each meter the women climbed and have massively surpassed their target.

Ahead of the action, Victoria Henry, one of the climbers said:

"It's going to be really hard work, it's going to be nerve-shredding for all of us and we may not succeed, but we're going to do everything we can to pull it off. Millions of people have called on Shell to get out of the Arctic but they're still trying to drill there anyway.

"If we reach the top we'll be able to see all three of Shell's London offices below us, meaning they'll be able to see us. Maybe then they'll stop ignoring the movement ranged against them."

Despite Shell's claim that they are well prepared for Arctic operations, evidence would suggest otherwise.

The oil major has developed a history of mishaps during its preliminary explorations and tests, drillships have slipped their moorings and been lost at sea, safety equipment has failed and the fierce Arctic conditions have forced their retreat.

New documents revealed earlier this week show that even in the comparatively safe waters of the North Sea Shell cannot operate without a steady trickle of oil and other polluting chemicals leaking out into the sea.

Not to mention the odd catastrophe, such as the gas leak on Brent B platform which killed two rig workers in 2003 and led to a court case where the oil giant was found guilty of safety lapses.

Visit EcoWatch's OFFSHORE OIL DRILLING page for more related news on this topic.

——–

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS BELOW: What will you do to save the Arctic?

——–

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A polar bear is seen stopping to drink near the north pole. Christopher Michel / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

The fossil fuel industry is driving polar bears to cannibalism.

Read More
Mathias Appel / Flickr

Get ready for double the cuteness! Red pandas, the crimson-colored, bushy-tailed forest dwellers who gave Firefox its name, actually consist of two different species.

Read More
Sponsored
A view of a washed out road near Utuado, Puerto Rico, after a Coast Guard Air Station Borinquen MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew dropped relief supplies to residents Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. The locals were stranded after Hurricane Maria by washed out roads and mudslides. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Eric D. Woodall / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Coral Natalie Negrón Almodóvar

The Earth began to shake as Tamar Hernández drove to visit her mother in Yauco, Puerto Rico, on Dec. 28, 2019. She did not feel that first tremor — she felt only the ensuing aftershocks — but she worried because her mother had an ankle injury and could not walk. Then Hernández thought, "What if something worse is coming our way?"

Read More
Flooded battery park tunnel is seen after Hurricane Sandy in 2012. CC BY 2.0

President Trump has long touted the efficacy of walls, funneling billions of Defense Department dollars to build a wall on the southern border. However, when the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) released a study that included plans for a sea wall to protect New Yorkers from sea-level rise and catastrophic storms like Hurricane Sandy, Trump mocked it as ineffective and unsightly.

Read More
A general view of fire damaged country in the The Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area near the town of Blackheath on Feb. 21, 2020 in Blackheath, Australia. Brook Mitchell / Getty Images

In a post-mortem of the Australian bushfires, which raged for five months, scientists have concluded that their intensity and duration far surpassed what climate models had predicted, according to a study published yesterday in Nature Climate Change.

Read More