Quantcast

Six Coal-fired Power Plants to Permanently Close by September

Energy

Ohio Environmental Council

The Ohio Environmental Council is praising First Energy Corp. for its plan to permanently close six coal-fired power plants, including four along Ohio’s Lake Erie coast.
 
The Akron-based energy company’s announcement on Jan. 26 said that the shut down will take place by September for the Bayshore (Toledo), Lakeshore (Cleveland), Eastlake (Eastlake) and Ashtabula (Ashtabula) power plants. The company’s plans also include the retirement of a power plant in Maryland and Pennsylvania.
 
Together, the six power plants have the capacity to generate nearly 2,700 megawatts of electricity—enough to power more than 600,000 homes.
 
“First Energy has made the right decision, and not just for its bottom line,” said Nolan Moser, clean air director and staff attorney for the Ohio Environmental Council.
 
“Pulling the plug on these dirty, old, outdated coal plants will deliver cleaner air to millions of Americans.  It will mean less asthma, less lost work and less mercury emissions. We thank First Energy for doing right by the people of Ohio.”
 
First Energy indicated that it is cheaper to close the facilities rather than install modern pollution controls to control mercury emissions, as required by new federal air rules. The plants were constructed in the 1950s when few if any pollution controls were required. The utility also indicated that the plants were not used very much in recent years.
 
“It makes sense to finally retire these old plants,” said Moser. “Most of these facilities first fired up when IKE was in the White House and Edsels prowled the highway. These old plants’ technology is inefficient, outdated, and by today’s standards, downright dirty. First Energy has made the right decision to move towards newer, cleaner and more cost effective resources.”
 
First Energy noted that the low cost of energy available from other, newer power generating facilities was a factor in its decision.
 
“In the past few years, First Energy and Ohio’s other investor-owned utilities have made aggressive investments in energy- and cost-saving technologies and renewable energy generating facilities,” said Moser. “This boost in energy efficiency and new wind and solar farms are beginning to power Ohio with clean, affordable power. These new resources are adding power capacity, putting people to work, and keeping energy costs down. We hope that First Energy will continue to invest in a cleaner energy future.”
 
Moser compared these new resources to the older facilities that First Energy plans to close down. “On the one hand, Ohio is investing in clean, efficient new energy resources; on the other some utilities still have 1950’s era coal plants operating. First Energy deserves credit for moving away from old, inefficient facilities and investing instead in clean, new technologies. That’s good for Ohio consumers, our economy and environment.”

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A verdant and productive urban garden in Havana. Susanne Bollinger / Wikimedia Commons

By Paul Brown

When countries run short of food, they need to find solutions fast, and one answer can be urban farming.

Read More Show Less
Trevor Noah appears on set during a taping of "The Daily Show with Trevor Noah" in New York on Nov. 26, 2018. The Daily Show With Trevor Noah / YouTube screenshot

By Lakshmi Magon

This year, three studies showed that humor is useful for engaging the public about climate change. The studies, published in The Journal of Science Communication, Comedy Studies and Science Communication, added to the growing wave of scientists, entertainers and politicians who agree.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
rhodesj / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

Cities around the country are considering following the lead of Berkeley, California, which became the first city to ban the installation of natural gas lines in new homes this summer.

Read More Show Less
Rebecca Burgess came up with the idea of a fibersheds project to develop an eco-friendly, locally sourced wardrobe. Nicolás Boullosa / CC BY 2.0

By Tara Lohan

If I were to open my refrigerator, the origins of most of the food wouldn't be too much of a mystery — the milk, cheese and produce all come from relatively nearby farms. I can tell from the labels on other packaged goods if they're fair trade, non-GMO or organic.

Read More Show Less
A television crew reports on Hurricane Dorian while waves crash against the Banana River sea wall. Paul Hennessy / SOPA Images / LightRocket / Getty Images

By Mark Hertsgaard and Kyle Pope

Some good news, for a change, about climate change: When hundreds of newsrooms focus their attention on the climate crisis, all at the same time, the public conversation about the problem gets better: more prominent, more informative, more urgent.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
U.S. Senators Chris Coons (D-Del.) and Mike Braun (R-Ind.) met with Bill Gates on Nov. 7 to discuss climate change and ways to address the challenge. Senator Chris Coons

The U.S. Senate's bipartisan climate caucus started with just two members, a Republican from Indiana and a Democrat from Delaware. Now it's up to eight members after two Democrats, one Independent and three more Republicans joined the caucus last week, as The Hill reported.

Read More Show Less
EPA scientists survey aquatic life in Newport, Oregon. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing to significantly limit the use of science in agency rulemaking around public health, the The New York Times reports.

Read More Show Less
A timelapse video shows synthetic material and baby fish collected from a plankton sample from a surface slick taken off Hawaii's coast. Honolulu Star-Advertiser / YouTube screenshot

A team of researchers led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration didn't intend to study plastic pollution when they towed a tiny mesh net through the waters off Hawaii's West Coast. Instead, they wanted to learn more about the habits of larval fish.

Read More Show Less