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Sierra Club and U.S. Rep. Mike Pompeo Spar in Twitter Debate on Climate Change

Climate

Because it flows frenetically, all day and every day, Twitter makes it easy to miss out on good exchanges.

And if you weren't on your laptop, phone or tablet around 12:30 p.m. on Thursday, you definitely missed a good one.

Back-and-forth tweeting between the Sierra Club and U.S. Rep. Mike Pompeo (R-KS) centered on climate change, but in a way that offered a little something for everybody. There was evidence of donations from the Koch Brothers; an accusation that U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy was unable to answer one of Pompeo's climate questions; and a couple requests from Pompeo for others to "show me the data."

The Sierra Club responded with a mention of the common belief of 97 percent of climate scientists, followed by a rather sharp zinger: "... it's refreshing to see a Republican suddenly so interested in science."

The Twitter exchange embedded below speaks for itself, but notice that Pompeo never responded to one of the Sierra Club's early questions: "So you're saying that you agree with the science that says that climate change is real and caused by burning fossil fuels?"

 

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