Quantcast

Show Your Support for Atlantic Bluefin Tuna by July 15

EcoWatch

EcoWatch has been reporting on the decline in population of bluefin tuna since the launch of its news service in October.

The Center for Biological Diversity reported that harvests of the imperiled tuna are more than double the legal limit and Western Atlantic bluefin tuna, which spawns in the Gulf of Mexico, have been reduced to 17 percent of 1950 levels.

Now, the Natural Resources Defense Council is spearheading a campaign to encourage people to speak out to help protect the giant fish and submit comments to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) by its July 15 deadline.

NOAA is currently considering major changes for managing Atlantic bluefin tuna, including the prohibition of surface longlines—a fishing practice that uses miles of line containing hundreds of baited hooks. For decades, surface longline fishing in the Gulf of Mexico has incidentally caught and killed spawning Atlantic bluefin tuna, an amazing fish that can swim almost 45 miles per hour and weighs up to 1,500 pounds, as well as more than 80 other types of non-target animals.

Bluefin tuna have even inspired a highly controversial television program on National Geographic called Wicked Tuna that follows a group of fishermen on their quest to cash in. As National Geographic's website put it, "When one bluefin can bring in as much as $20,000—they’ll do whatever it takes to hook up."

And that's exactly what the global fishing market is doing. Industrial-scale fishing vessels employing massive purse-like nets in the Mediterranean resulted in millions of dollars worth of bluefin tuna caught last June.

Pew Environment Group showed that due to high demand and increasing prices, thousands of bluefin worth millions of dollars were caught this season. In fact, so many bluefin were pulled in by French and Spanish vessels that they were ordered to stop fishing after just two weeks. To more clearly illustrate the severity of this issue, Pew Environment Group created an infographic to educate people about the Atlantic bluefin, discover why its population has declined and learn what must be done to help the species recover.

Thanks to the Center for Biological Diversity, Natural Resources Defense Council and Pew Environment Group for their continued effort in bringing this issue to the forefront. EcoWatch unites these voices to provide a thorough overview and accelerate solutions.

Visit EcoWatch's BIODIVERSITY page for more related news on this topic.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Despite huge strides in improving the lives of children since 1989, many of the world's poorest are being left behind, the United Nations children's fund UNICEF warned Monday.

Read More Show Less
At least seven people have died in a Bangladesh pipeline explosion. Youtube screenshot

At least seven people were killed when a gas pipeline exploded in Bangladesh Sunday, and another 25 were injured, the Associated Press reported.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
The Shell Puget Sound Refinery in Anacortes, Washington. John Westrock / Flickr

The Washington Department of Ecology responded to an oil spill that took place Friday night when a Crowley Maritime Barge was transferring five million gallons of oil to the Shell Puget Sound Refinery, CNN reported.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Claire L. Jarvis

A ruckus over biofuels has been brewing in Iowa.

Read More Show Less
Serena and Venus Williams have been known to follow a vegan diet. Edwin Martinez / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Whitney E. Akers

  • "The Game Changers" is a new documentary on Netflix that posits a vegan diet can improve athletic performance in professional athletes.

  • Limited studies available show that the type of diet — plant-based or omnivorous — doesn't give you an athletic advantage.

  • We talked to experts about what diet is the best for athletic performance.

Packed with record-setting athletes displaying cut physiques and explosive power, "The Game Changers," a new documentary on Netflix, has a clear message: Vegan is best.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
An illegally trafficked tiger skull and pelt. Ryan Moehring / USFWS

By John R. Platt

When it comes to solving problems related to wildlife trade, there are an awful lot of "sticky widgets."

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE

Inflammation can be both good and bad.

On one hand, it helps your body defend itself from infection and injury. On the other hand, chronic inflammation can lead to weight gain and disease.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Dan Nosowitz

It's no secret that the past few years have been disastrous for the American farming industry.

Read More Show Less