Quantcast

Shark Attack Survivors Unite to Save Sharks

Pew Environment Group

Shark attack survivors from around the globe have joined the Pew Environment Group’s effort to restore and conserve the world’s dwindling shark populations. Despite terrifying attacks and grave injuries, the survivors recognize that these predators are in peril, a situation that puts the ocean and all its marine life at risk.

The shark attack survivors are pressing world leaders to act for shark conservation. So far, the survivors have been instrumental in persuading the U.S. Congress to close loopholes in the nation’s shark finning ban—a law signed by President Obama in 2011. They have supported leaders, including the presidents of Palau and Honduras, who declared their waters shark sanctuaries. And the survivors have visited the United Nations to urge countries to develop shark sanctuaries, conservation plans and similar measures.

Shark attack survivors at the U.S. Capitol. Photo by Pew Environment Group.

The group of more than a dozen is organized by Pew’s Debbie Salamone, herself a survivor of a shark attack. Others in the group come from the U.S., Europe, Australia and South Africa. They include a school principal, a Wall Street banker, an Australian navy diver and a professional photographer. Some have lost arms or legs, yet they harbor no animosity toward their attackers and believe they are uniquely qualified to call for shark protections.

The survivors’ stories of attack, recovery and forgiveness have sparked worldwide interest.

"If a group like us can see the value in saving sharks, shouldn't everyone?" asked Debbie Salamone, attack survivor and shark conservation advocate.

To learn more about the survivors, click on their names below:

Visit EcoWatch's BIODIVERSITY page for more related news on this topic.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Insects play a vital role in ecosystems and humans are particularly dependent on them for food. Dmitry Grigoriev / Unsplash

By Ajit Niranjan

Seven 'no-regret' actions could rescue insects on the road to extinction, a new roadmap for conservation says, helping ecosystems even where a lack of research means scientists cannot prove benefits to individual species.

Read More
Visitors to the Hollywood & Highland mall in Hollywood wear face masks on Jan. 27 . Five people in the U.S. have tested positive for the deadly strain of Coronavirus, one each in Washington, Illinois and Arizona, and two in Southern California, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ROBYN BECK / AFP / Getty Images

As a new coronavirus continues to spread across the globe, concerns have emerged that Trump administration cuts to science and health agencies have hampered the U.S. ability to respond.

Read More
Sponsored
Workers evacuate the Lonja del Comercio (Commerce Market) in Havana, Cuba after an earthquake rattled the island Tuesday. ADALBERTO ROQUE / AFP via Getty Images

A 7.7 magnitude earthquake shook the Caribbean Tuesday, rattling people from Miami to Mexico.

Read More
A roller coaster on the Jersey Shore flooded after Hurricane Sandy. Photo credit: Hurricane_Sandy_New_Jersey_Pier.jpg: Master Sgt. Mark C. Olsen / U.S. Air Force / New Jersey National Guard / CC BY 2.0

New Jersey will be the first state in the U.S. to require builders to take the climate crisis into consideration before seeking permission for a project.

Read More
The Director of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Gao Fu speaks on Jan. 26 during a press briefing on studying the 2019-nCoV coronavirus and developing a vaccine to prevent it. Roman Balandin / TASS / Getty Images

Editor's note: The coronavirus that started in Wuhan has sickened more than 4,000 people and killed at least 100 in China as of Jan. 27, 2020. Thailand and Hong Kong each have reported eight confirmed cases, and five people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with the illness. People are hoping for a vaccine to slow the spread of the disease.

Read More