Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Shark Attack Survivors Unite to Save Sharks

Shark Attack Survivors Unite to Save Sharks

Pew Environment Group

Shark attack survivors from around the globe have joined the Pew Environment Group’s effort to restore and conserve the world’s dwindling shark populations. Despite terrifying attacks and grave injuries, the survivors recognize that these predators are in peril, a situation that puts the ocean and all its marine life at risk.

The shark attack survivors are pressing world leaders to act for shark conservation. So far, the survivors have been instrumental in persuading the U.S. Congress to close loopholes in the nation’s shark finning ban—a law signed by President Obama in 2011. They have supported leaders, including the presidents of Palau and Honduras, who declared their waters shark sanctuaries. And the survivors have visited the United Nations to urge countries to develop shark sanctuaries, conservation plans and similar measures.

Shark attack survivors at the U.S. Capitol. Photo by Pew Environment Group.

The group of more than a dozen is organized by Pew’s Debbie Salamone, herself a survivor of a shark attack. Others in the group come from the U.S., Europe, Australia and South Africa. They include a school principal, a Wall Street banker, an Australian navy diver and a professional photographer. Some have lost arms or legs, yet they harbor no animosity toward their attackers and believe they are uniquely qualified to call for shark protections.

The survivors’ stories of attack, recovery and forgiveness have sparked worldwide interest.

"If a group like us can see the value in saving sharks, shouldn't everyone?" asked Debbie Salamone, attack survivor and shark conservation advocate.

To learn more about the survivors, click on their names below:

Visit EcoWatch's BIODIVERSITY page for more related news on this topic.

 

People Have the Power - VOTE 2020

Climate-action nonprofit Pathway to Paris first launched in 2014 with an "intimate evening" of music and conversation after the People's Climate March in New York City.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Heo Suwat Waterfall in Khao Yai National Park in Thailand. sarote pruksachat / Moment / Getty Images

A national park in Thailand has come up with an innovative way to make sure guests clean up their own trash: mail it back to them.

Read More Show Less

Trending

The 2020 presidential election poses a critical test of climate conservatives' willingness to put their environmental concerns before party politics. filo / Getty Images

By Ilana Cohen

Four years ago, Jacob Abel cast his first presidential vote for Donald Trump. As a young conservative from Concord, North Carolina, the choice felt natural.

But this November, he plans to cast a "protest vote" for a write-in candidate or abstain from casting a ballot for president. A determining factor in his 180-degree turn? Climate change.

Read More Show Less
Headquarters of the World Health Organization in Geneva amid the COVID-19 outbreak on Aug. 17, 2020. FABRICE COFFRINI / AFP via Getty Images

The World Health Organization (WHO) announced Monday that 64 high-income nations have joined an effort to distribute a COVID-19 vaccine fairly, prioritizing the most vulnerable citizens, as Science reported. The program is called the COVID-19 Vaccines Global Access Facility, or Covax, and it is a joint effort led by the WHO, the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.

Read More Show Less
Exterior of Cold Tube demonstration pavilion. Lea Ruefenacht

By Gloria Oladipo

In the face of dangerous heat waves this summer, Americans have taken shelter in air conditioned cooling centers. Normally, that would be a wise choice, but during a pandemic, indoor shelters present new risks. The same air conditioning systems that keep us cool recirculate air around us, potentially spreading the coronavirus.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch