Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

10 Best Environmental Records in the Senate

Popular
10 Best Environmental Records in the Senate

Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) recently emerged as one of the upper chamber's biggest environmental stalwarts after grilling both Rick Perry and Ryan Zinke over their climate denial during hearings.

But Franken—who is dipping into his comedic roots in a hilarious new web series about climate change—isn't the only U.S. senator who consistently champions environmental safeguards.


Citing data from the League of Conservation Voters (LCV), Business Insider recently featured 10 senators with the best voting records on environmental legislation.

Unsurprisingly, every senator on the list is a Democrat. Meanwhile, we could probably count with two hands the number of Republicans in Congress who think climate change is even real.

"The stakes for protecting the environment and public health have never been higher and the threats have never been greater," the LCV said earlier this year. "We must do more than ever to work with our allies in Congress—and mobilize the public—to fight the Trump administration and the extreme Congressional leadership who want to roll back our bedrock environmental laws and President Obama's incredible progress."

Here are the 10 best senators for the environment:

Sen. Jeff Merkley, Democrat from Oregon. Lifetime score: 99%

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Democrat from Massachusetts. Lifetime score: 98%

Sen. Cory Booker, Democrat from New Jersey. Lifetime score: 98%

Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, Democrat from Rhode Island. Lifetime score: 98%

Sen. Tammy Baldwin, Democrat from Wisconsin. Lifetime score: 97%

Sen. Chris Murphy, Democrat from Connecticut. Lifetime score: 96%

Sen. Richard Blumenthal, Democrat from Connecticut. Lifetime score: 96%

Sen. Al Franken, Democrat from Minnesota. Lifetime score: 96%

Sen. Tom Udall, Democrat from New Mexico. Lifetime score: 96%

Sen. Jack Reed, Democrat from Rhode Island. Lifetime score: 96%

You might be scratching your head wondering why Sen. Bernie Sanders isn't on this list. Well, you might remember that last year he was very busy "running his historic presidential campaign," as Josh Fox pointed out in this blog post, and missed some critical environmental votes.

U.S. President Joe Biden sits in the Oval Office as he signs a series of orders at the White House in Washington, D.C. on January 20, 2021. Jim Watson / AFP / Getty Images

President Joe Biden officially took office Wednesday, and immediately set to work reversing some of former President Donald Trump's environmental policies.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Erik McGregor / LightRocket / Getty Images

In many schools, the study of climate change is limited to the science. But at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, students in one class also learn how to take climate action.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Pexels

By Daniel Raichel

Industry would have us believe that pesticides help sustain food production — a necessary chemical trade-off for keeping harmful bugs at bay and ensuring we have enough to eat. But the data often tell a different story—particularly in the case of neonicotinoid pesticides, also known as neonics.

Read More Show Less
A Fridays for Future activist on Oct. 9, 2020 in Turin, Italy. Stefano Guidi / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

Fed up with "empty promises" from world leaders, a dozen youth activists on Wednesday demanded newly sworn-in President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris take swift and bold climate action — even more far-reaching than promised on the campaign trail — stating that their "present and future depend on the actions your government takes within the next four years."

Read More Show Less
Several innovative companies have begun brainstorming better ways to repurpose old wind turbine blades. xu wu / Getty Images

When wind turbine blades reach the end of their usefulness, most are sawed into transportable pieces and hauled to landfills, where they never break down. Because of the resources and energy that go into producing these blades, this type of disposal is inefficient and wasteful. Recently, several innovative companies have begun brainstorming better ways to repurpose this green technology after it goes offline.

Read More Show Less