Quantcast

8 Reasons Senate Farm Bill Is Better Than House Bill

Politics

By Scott Faber

It's not hard to see the differences between the terrible, partisan House farm bill and the bipartisan Senate farm bill.


Here are eight ways the Senate version—which passed in the Senate last week—is better than the House bill:

1. Thanks to Sen. Chuck Grassley, the Senate bill finally denies farm subsidies to city slickers. By contrast, the House bill would create new loopholes that allow even more city dwellers to get farm payments.

2. The Senate bill also tightens a means test that denies farm subsidies to billionaires. The House bill would make billionaires like Charles Schwab and Paul Allen eligible for farm payments again.

3. The Senate bill protects anti-hunger assistance programs. Meanwhile, the House bill would take food off the tables of 2 million people, including children and the elderly.

4. The Senate bill also preserves funding for voluntary conservation programs. The House bill cuts conservation programs by nearly $1 billion.

5. The Senate bill boosts funding for local food programs. By contrast, the House bill cuts funding for programs that link farmers with local consumers.

6. The Senate bill preserves state food laws. The House bill wipes hundreds of state and local food laws off the books, including state laws that help farmers market their goods.

7. The Senate bill preserves local pesticide laws. Meanwhile, the House bill would block cities and counties from protecting schoolyards and playgrounds from toxic pesticides.

8. The Senate bill also protects drinking water from pesticides. By contrast, the House bill includes riders that would allow farmers to spray pesticides into drinking water sources.

In light of these differences, it's easy to understand why the House bill passed without any support from Democrats, while the Senate bill passed with 86 votes.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The icebreaker Polar Star in Antarctica. Ville Miettinen / The Revelator / CC BY-NC 2.0

By Tara Lohan

Part of Joellen Russell's job is to help illuminate the deep darkness — to shine a light on what's happening beneath the surface of the ocean. And it's one of the most important jobs in the world right now.

Read More
Psychedelic mushrooms are currently classified as a Schedule I drug by the FDA, and possession is a felony nationwide. juriskraulis / iStock / Getty Images

A single experience with "magic mushrooms" has long-lasting effects on cancer patients, according to a new study that found patients still felt positive benefits five years later, as CNN reported.

Read More
Sponsored
Democratic presidential candidate, former Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a campaign town hall meeting at Vista Grande Jan. 28 in Clinton, Iowa. The Iowa caucuses are February 3. Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

Joe Biden put his hand on the chest of an Iowa voter and told the man to vote for someone else when the voter asked the former vice president about his plans to replace gas pipelines, The Independent reported.

Read More
Greening the barren mountain has helped recharge groundwater levels in the villages. Photo by Gurvinder Singh. Mongabay India

By Gurvinder Singh

Jamini Mohan Mahanty is out for a morning walk every day. At 91, he is hale and hearty. A resident of Jharbagda village in Purulia district, West Bengal, Mahanty thanks the "green mountain" in his village for having added some extra years to his life.

Read More
A wild Woodland Bison walks in the Arctic wilderness. RyersonClark / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Paul Brown

Releasing herds of large animals onto the tundra − rewilding the Arctic − to create vast grasslands could slow down global heating by storing carbon and preserving the permafrost, UK scientists say.

Read More